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Pacific Encounters: Art and Divinity in Polynesia, 1760-1860 (review)

Pacific Encounters: Art and Divinity in Polynesia, 1760-1860 (review) way, Samoan Wedding also retains a measure of cultural authenticity by featuring an all-Samoan ensemble of actors and actresses. The Land Has Eyes and Samoan Wedding thus provide an interesting contrast to No. 2. While it may be argued that the absence of Fijians in the film denotes a kind of cultural inauthenticity, this should not necessarily be viewed as marring the film's integrity or value; there is a high degree of authenticity in terms of the narrative, which is written by a person of Fijian ancestry. Here, the line between inauthenticity and authenticity, representation and misrepresentation is blurred and not easily delineated. Despite some drawbacks (specifically, actors who don't look Fijian, in a film about Fijians in Auckland), one of the great strengths of No. 2 lies in its ability to capture the subtleties of the human experience. In one quiet scene, Nanna Maria lies alone on her bed, breathing in as much of life as she can through an oxygen mask. The knowledge of Nanna's mortality is made all the more poignant by the sounds of her family outside, laughing, fighting, living. And therein lies the denouement of the film-- even as the breath of life http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Pacific Encounters: Art and Divinity in Polynesia, 1760-1860 (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 19 (2) – Aug 13, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9464
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Abstract

way, Samoan Wedding also retains a measure of cultural authenticity by featuring an all-Samoan ensemble of actors and actresses. The Land Has Eyes and Samoan Wedding thus provide an interesting contrast to No. 2. While it may be argued that the absence of Fijians in the film denotes a kind of cultural inauthenticity, this should not necessarily be viewed as marring the film's integrity or value; there is a high degree of authenticity in terms of the narrative, which is written by a person of Fijian ancestry. Here, the line between inauthenticity and authenticity, representation and misrepresentation is blurred and not easily delineated. Despite some drawbacks (specifically, actors who don't look Fijian, in a film about Fijians in Auckland), one of the great strengths of No. 2 lies in its ability to capture the subtleties of the human experience. In one quiet scene, Nanna Maria lies alone on her bed, breathing in as much of life as she can through an oxygen mask. The knowledge of Nanna's mortality is made all the more poignant by the sounds of her family outside, laughing, fighting, living. And therein lies the denouement of the film-- even as the breath of life

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 13, 2007

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