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Overcoming Greed: Buddhists and Christians in Consumerist Society

Overcoming Greed: Buddhists and Christians in Consumerist Society OVERCOMING GREED Paul F. Knitter Xavier University As I understand my assignment, I don't find it an easy one. I've been instructed to carry on a lopsided dialogue. Generally, what generates productive dialogue is a proper balance of learning and questioning. My assigned job in this exchange is to question more than learn--to offer some Christian queries about how Buddhists think we can overcome greed and find a path out of the consumerist jungle that surrounds us. Actually, I'd prefer it the other way around, for I'm convinced that we Christians have some very important, if not absolutely vital, things to learn from Buddhists in our own efforts to deal with the jungle. And I will mention some of them. But, following instructions, my main focus in what follows will be on areas where I suspect that Buddhists can learn something, maybe something very helpful, in our shared efforts to deal with greed and the havoc it is working on people and planet. I need to specify my Christian voice in this conversation--or, as they say, where I'm coming from within the many and diverse neighborhoods that make up the Christian community. I'll be reflecting and speaking out http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Overcoming Greed: Buddhists and Christians in Consumerist Society

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 24 (1) – Jan 10, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

OVERCOMING GREED Paul F. Knitter Xavier University As I understand my assignment, I don't find it an easy one. I've been instructed to carry on a lopsided dialogue. Generally, what generates productive dialogue is a proper balance of learning and questioning. My assigned job in this exchange is to question more than learn--to offer some Christian queries about how Buddhists think we can overcome greed and find a path out of the consumerist jungle that surrounds us. Actually, I'd prefer it the other way around, for I'm convinced that we Christians have some very important, if not absolutely vital, things to learn from Buddhists in our own efforts to deal with the jungle. And I will mention some of them. But, following instructions, my main focus in what follows will be on areas where I suspect that Buddhists can learn something, maybe something very helpful, in our shared efforts to deal with greed and the havoc it is working on people and planet. I need to specify my Christian voice in this conversation--or, as they say, where I'm coming from within the many and diverse neighborhoods that make up the Christian community. I'll be reflecting and speaking out

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 10, 2004

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