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Nitobe and Royce: Bushidō and the Philosophy of Loyalty

Nitobe and Royce: Bushidō and the Philosophy of Loyalty NITOBE AND ROYCE: BUSHID AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF LOYALTY Central Connecticut State University foust@ccsu.edu In recent years, scholars have increasingly paid attention to the philosophy of Josiah Royce (1855­1916). Long lost in the shadow of fellow classical American figures (e.g., Emerson, Peirce, James, and Dewey), Royce's philosophy has enjoyed a re nascence, with a spate of publications in a variety of venues studying and apply ing his thought.1 Like his philosophical brethren, Royce wrote on a wide variety of subjects, his discussions underpinned by a smattering of influences. Much has been remarked of the various Western sources that made an impression on Royce's thought, but comparatively little has been said of his indebtedness to Eastern sources. Kurt Leidecker's Josiah Royce and Indian Thought 2 and Frank M. Oppenheim's "Royce's Windows to the East"3 stand as notable exceptions, with Oppenheim's more recent treatment offering a more comprehensive "chronological survey of Royce's increasing interest in things Asian."4 Still, Oppenheim gives only passing attention to the influence of Japanese thought on Royce's philosophy.5 Here, I would like to extend the literature on Eastern influences on Royce's thought by focusing on what is arguably the most distinctive facet of Royce's thought: his http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Nitobe and Royce: Bushidō and the Philosophy of Loyalty

Philosophy East and West , Volume 65 (4) – Oct 23, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
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Abstract

NITOBE AND ROYCE: BUSHID AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF LOYALTY Central Connecticut State University foust@ccsu.edu In recent years, scholars have increasingly paid attention to the philosophy of Josiah Royce (1855­1916). Long lost in the shadow of fellow classical American figures (e.g., Emerson, Peirce, James, and Dewey), Royce's philosophy has enjoyed a re nascence, with a spate of publications in a variety of venues studying and apply ing his thought.1 Like his philosophical brethren, Royce wrote on a wide variety of subjects, his discussions underpinned by a smattering of influences. Much has been remarked of the various Western sources that made an impression on Royce's thought, but comparatively little has been said of his indebtedness to Eastern sources. Kurt Leidecker's Josiah Royce and Indian Thought 2 and Frank M. Oppenheim's "Royce's Windows to the East"3 stand as notable exceptions, with Oppenheim's more recent treatment offering a more comprehensive "chronological survey of Royce's increasing interest in things Asian."4 Still, Oppenheim gives only passing attention to the influence of Japanese thought on Royce's philosophy.5 Here, I would like to extend the literature on Eastern influences on Royce's thought by focusing on what is arguably the most distinctive facet of Royce's thought: his

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 23, 2015

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