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Martin Luther and Buddhism: The Aesthetics of Suffering (review)

Martin Luther and Buddhism: The Aesthetics of Suffering (review) BOOK REVIEWS tunate that the three parts of the book are not well integrated, and the short chapters place the burden on the reader to bring coherence. The complex theoretical questions raised are not dealt with in enough depth to satisfy, and the two major strands of inquiry seem almost independent of one another, namely (1) what parallels exist between Christianity and Buddhism involving transcendence and violence, and (2) how can indigenous primal religions instruct universalizing religions? The Buddhist-Christian comparisons are frustrating in their use of the overworked and abstract dichotomy between transcendence and immanence. Moreover, the praise of primal regard for sacred space, nature, and this-worldly affairs neglects resources in the Christian or Buddhist traditions that might provide precedent for such appreciation. On the other hand, it is plausible that primal traditions have something to teach, and that aggressive universalizing religions share formal features and flaws. This book is recommended for scholars and graduate students, especially those interested in violence against primal religions, the inculturation process of a foreign religion, and theological directives for postcolonial religious encounter. Sarah K. Pinnock Trinity University MARTIN LUTHER AND BUDDHISM: THE AESTHETICS OF SUFFERING. By Paul S. Chung. Eugene, OR: Wipf http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Martin Luther and Buddhism: The Aesthetics of Suffering (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 6, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS tunate that the three parts of the book are not well integrated, and the short chapters place the burden on the reader to bring coherence. The complex theoretical questions raised are not dealt with in enough depth to satisfy, and the two major strands of inquiry seem almost independent of one another, namely (1) what parallels exist between Christianity and Buddhism involving transcendence and violence, and (2) how can indigenous primal religions instruct universalizing religions? The Buddhist-Christian comparisons are frustrating in their use of the overworked and abstract dichotomy between transcendence and immanence. Moreover, the praise of primal regard for sacred space, nature, and this-worldly affairs neglects resources in the Christian or Buddhist traditions that might provide precedent for such appreciation. On the other hand, it is plausible that primal traditions have something to teach, and that aggressive universalizing religions share formal features and flaws. This book is recommended for scholars and graduate students, especially those interested in violence against primal religions, the inculturation process of a foreign religion, and theological directives for postcolonial religious encounter. Sarah K. Pinnock Trinity University MARTIN LUTHER AND BUDDHISM: THE AESTHETICS OF SUFFERING. By Paul S. Chung. Eugene, OR: Wipf

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 6, 2006

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