Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Introduction: Remarks in Memory of David W. Chappell

Introduction: Remarks in Memory of David W. Chappell THINKING GLOBALLY: BUDDHIST-CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY AND ETHICS IN HONOR OF DAVID CHAPPELL Loyola Marymount University, June 4, 2005 On December 8, 1996, David Chappell delivered the Bodhi Day lecture, titled "Bodhisattva in the Twenty-first Century," at the Hompa Hongwanji Temple in central Oahu. The lecture wasn't autobiographical--David was much too unassuming to have thought of himself in these terms--but those of us who loved David and who had the privilege of working with him over many years have no such qualms. David's dedication, sincerity of spirit, generosity, and compassion were truly bodhisattva-like. In his lecture David contrasts the superficial, electronic Internet connectedness of our lives today with the common ground discovered at Awakening based on what David called "heart connection," an insight into the shared nature of all sentient beings that leads to empathy, compassion, and kindness. In contrast to enlightened heart connectedness, Internet interaction lacks the capacity of an intimacy with the varied phenomena of life at each moment. "The Internet," he observes, "allows us to ease our solitude by getting access to things that are compatible with our own interests. However, Buddhism considers that the achievement of enlightenment involves being able to be compatible and have empathy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Introduction: Remarks in Memory of David W. Chappell

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 6, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/introduction-remarks-in-memory-of-david-w-chappell-u1KrswoLH0
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THINKING GLOBALLY: BUDDHIST-CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY AND ETHICS IN HONOR OF DAVID CHAPPELL Loyola Marymount University, June 4, 2005 On December 8, 1996, David Chappell delivered the Bodhi Day lecture, titled "Bodhisattva in the Twenty-first Century," at the Hompa Hongwanji Temple in central Oahu. The lecture wasn't autobiographical--David was much too unassuming to have thought of himself in these terms--but those of us who loved David and who had the privilege of working with him over many years have no such qualms. David's dedication, sincerity of spirit, generosity, and compassion were truly bodhisattva-like. In his lecture David contrasts the superficial, electronic Internet connectedness of our lives today with the common ground discovered at Awakening based on what David called "heart connection," an insight into the shared nature of all sentient beings that leads to empathy, compassion, and kindness. In contrast to enlightened heart connectedness, Internet interaction lacks the capacity of an intimacy with the varied phenomena of life at each moment. "The Internet," he observes, "allows us to ease our solitude by getting access to things that are compatible with our own interests. However, Buddhism considers that the achievement of enlightenment involves being able to be compatible and have empathy

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 6, 2006

There are no references for this article.