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Imagining Karma, Ethical Transformation in Amerindian, Buddhist and Greek Rebirth (review)

Imagining Karma, Ethical Transformation in Amerindian, Buddhist and Greek Rebirth (review) BOOK REV IEWS nothingness, the contemporary era requires an exploration of concepts such as compassion, forgiveness, love, reconciliation, and service. I would recommend The Formless Self to a newcomer, but only when a critique of this conceptual approach or the Kyoto School is read as a counterpoint. (One good possibility would be Jan Van Bragt's "Kyoto Philosophy--Intrinsically Nationalistic?" in Rude Awakenings, pp. 233­254.) New conversation partners, new frameworks, and new interpretive strategies are needed. The times ask more and different things of all of us, especially with regard to issues of interpretation and appropriation in cross-cultural studies. Newman Robert Glass Friends World Program Long Island University IMAGINING KARMA, ETHICAL TRANSFORMATION IN AMERINDIAN, BUDDHIST, AND GREEK REBIRTH. By Gananath Obeyesekere. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. 448 pp. Gananath Obeyesekere, professor emeritus of anthropology at Princeton University, is probably one of the world's greatest living anthropologists. The proof of that assertion lies in this his latest work on comparative anthropology, a study of the concept and practice of rebirth--"reincarnation" as he calls it--from ancient Greece and India to modern West Africa, Melanesia, and North America. In what follows let me briefly set forth what I understand his central thesis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Imagining Karma, Ethical Transformation in Amerindian, Buddhist and Greek Rebirth (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 24 (1) – Jan 10, 2004

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2004 The University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9472
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Abstract

BOOK REV IEWS nothingness, the contemporary era requires an exploration of concepts such as compassion, forgiveness, love, reconciliation, and service. I would recommend The Formless Self to a newcomer, but only when a critique of this conceptual approach or the Kyoto School is read as a counterpoint. (One good possibility would be Jan Van Bragt's "Kyoto Philosophy--Intrinsically Nationalistic?" in Rude Awakenings, pp. 233­254.) New conversation partners, new frameworks, and new interpretive strategies are needed. The times ask more and different things of all of us, especially with regard to issues of interpretation and appropriation in cross-cultural studies. Newman Robert Glass Friends World Program Long Island University IMAGINING KARMA, ETHICAL TRANSFORMATION IN AMERINDIAN, BUDDHIST, AND GREEK REBIRTH. By Gananath Obeyesekere. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. 448 pp. Gananath Obeyesekere, professor emeritus of anthropology at Princeton University, is probably one of the world's greatest living anthropologists. The proof of that assertion lies in this his latest work on comparative anthropology, a study of the concept and practice of rebirth--"reincarnation" as he calls it--from ancient Greece and India to modern West Africa, Melanesia, and North America. In what follows let me briefly set forth what I understand his central thesis

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 10, 2004

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