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Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Religious Pluralism: Buddhist and Christian Perspectives

Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Religious Pluralism: Buddhist and Christian Perspectives COMPARATIVE ETHICS Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Religious Pluralism: Buddhist and Christian Perspectives 1 John D'Arcy May Irish School of Ecumenics,Trinity College Dublin The question of how the concept of human rights--so crucially important for the implementation of justice in a rapidly globalizing world--relates to the plurality of cultures and religions has still not been solved. Controversies such as those over land rights in Aboriginal Australia and Asian values in Southeast Asia have shown this repeatedly. In such cases, discussion eventually becomes focused on the universality of human rights, not just the global scope of the idea itself but the universal validity of catalogues of specific rights such as those contained in the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights (December 10, 1948). There is something arbitrary and unsystematic about such charters, as is shown by the rather different emphases in the African and Islamic documents which were meant to correct the UN's lack of universality.2 But if, in attempting to explore this problem seriously, one appears to tamper with the principle of universality, one can easily be accused of diluting the ethical force of human rights by questioning their applicability to every human being without exception. Nothing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Religious Pluralism: Buddhist and Christian Perspectives

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 6, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

COMPARATIVE ETHICS Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Religious Pluralism: Buddhist and Christian Perspectives 1 John D'Arcy May Irish School of Ecumenics,Trinity College Dublin The question of how the concept of human rights--so crucially important for the implementation of justice in a rapidly globalizing world--relates to the plurality of cultures and religions has still not been solved. Controversies such as those over land rights in Aboriginal Australia and Asian values in Southeast Asia have shown this repeatedly. In such cases, discussion eventually becomes focused on the universality of human rights, not just the global scope of the idea itself but the universal validity of catalogues of specific rights such as those contained in the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights (December 10, 1948). There is something arbitrary and unsystematic about such charters, as is shown by the rather different emphases in the African and Islamic documents which were meant to correct the UN's lack of universality.2 But if, in attempting to explore this problem seriously, one appears to tamper with the principle of universality, one can easily be accused of diluting the ethical force of human rights by questioning their applicability to every human being without exception. Nothing

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 6, 2006

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