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Gandhi's Hope: Learning from Other Religions as a Path to Peace (review)

Gandhi's Hope: Learning from Other Religions as a Path to Peace (review) BOOK REVIEWS originated among Protestants in South Korea, and most theologians associated with this movement belong to liberal wings of the Presbyterian Church. The Minjung movement is also known for its social activism on behalf of the poor and oppressed so that its starting point is suffering and the struggle for liberation in solidarity with the poor. Consequently, Chung concludes that this tradition of Korean theological reflection and practice can be deepened by Luther's theology of the Cross. In other words, Chung envisions a three-way dialogue between Luther's theology, Minjung theology, and Mahayana Buddhism. Of all the work in Luther studies of which I am aware, Martin Luther and Buddhism might turn out to be among the most theologically important for both AngloEuropean and Asian Christians interested in dialogue with Buddhism. Buddhists will also benefit from reading this book because of the scholarly insights Chung provides the reader about Luther's theology as well as Protestant thought in general. After all, the primary goal of interreligious dialogue is mutual creative transformation, a process that requires both Buddhists and Christians to understand the heart of one another's traditions and experiences. For this reason alone, Martin Luther and Buddhism deserves the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Gandhi's Hope: Learning from Other Religions as a Path to Peace (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 6, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS originated among Protestants in South Korea, and most theologians associated with this movement belong to liberal wings of the Presbyterian Church. The Minjung movement is also known for its social activism on behalf of the poor and oppressed so that its starting point is suffering and the struggle for liberation in solidarity with the poor. Consequently, Chung concludes that this tradition of Korean theological reflection and practice can be deepened by Luther's theology of the Cross. In other words, Chung envisions a three-way dialogue between Luther's theology, Minjung theology, and Mahayana Buddhism. Of all the work in Luther studies of which I am aware, Martin Luther and Buddhism might turn out to be among the most theologically important for both AngloEuropean and Asian Christians interested in dialogue with Buddhism. Buddhists will also benefit from reading this book because of the scholarly insights Chung provides the reader about Luther's theology as well as Protestant thought in general. After all, the primary goal of interreligious dialogue is mutual creative transformation, a process that requires both Buddhists and Christians to understand the heart of one another's traditions and experiences. For this reason alone, Martin Luther and Buddhism deserves the

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 6, 2006

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