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From None but Self Expect Applause

From None but Self Expect Applause Features 7 Companion to Neo-Confucian Philosophy, ed. John Makeham [New York: Springer, 2010] p. 205). Additionally, Xunzi's formulation of the idea that good governance arises out of having the right person rather than out of laws found the favor of Hu Hong (1105­1161) among others (The Collected Works of Hu Hong [Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1987], 8.18). I thank Justin Tiwald for bringing these to my attention. 12. There is no implication that, in the future, oxen should be spared (at the expense of sheep). Rather, it is accepted that animals must be used as sacrificial offerings to satisfy the rituals, regardless of the compassion evoked by their fear. 13. Indeed, later Confucians do take this stance, not simply toward animals, but toward all aspects of our environment. As Bai notes, the later Confucian thinker Zhou Dunyi (1017­1073) refused to cut the grass in front of his house because he felt one with it (p. 54). While a variety of Confucians from the Song dynasty onward hold some version of this view, this is an important way in which they differ drastically from the early Confucians (and one can certainly be pardoned for thinking that Buddhist thought played an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

From None but Self Expect Applause

China Review International , Volume 20 (1) – Jan 22, 2013

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9367
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Abstract

Features 7 Companion to Neo-Confucian Philosophy, ed. John Makeham [New York: Springer, 2010] p. 205). Additionally, Xunzi's formulation of the idea that good governance arises out of having the right person rather than out of laws found the favor of Hu Hong (1105­1161) among others (The Collected Works of Hu Hong [Beijing: Zhonghua shuju, 1987], 8.18). I thank Justin Tiwald for bringing these to my attention. 12. There is no implication that, in the future, oxen should be spared (at the expense of sheep). Rather, it is accepted that animals must be used as sacrificial offerings to satisfy the rituals, regardless of the compassion evoked by their fear. 13. Indeed, later Confucians do take this stance, not simply toward animals, but toward all aspects of our environment. As Bai notes, the later Confucian thinker Zhou Dunyi (1017­1073) refused to cut the grass in front of his house because he felt one with it (p. 54). While a variety of Confucians from the Song dynasty onward hold some version of this view, this is an important way in which they differ drastically from the early Confucians (and one can certainly be pardoned for thinking that Buddhist thought played an

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 22, 2013

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