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Eye on Korea: An Insider Account of Korean-American Relations (review)

Eye on Korea: An Insider Account of Korean-American Relations (review) book reviews Han'guk k1ndae ch0ngch'i sasangsa y0ngu: minjok up'a 1i sill0k yangs0ng undongnon (A Study of Modern Korean Political Thought: Right-wing Nationalists' Self-Strengthening Movement)--one cannot fail to appreciate the significance of Protestant figures such as An Ch'angho and Cho Mansik, or the March First Movement. Yet little is made of the fact that Protestantism provided ideological inspiration and institutional bases for these men and the movement. Kenneth M. Wells's New God, New Nation: Protestants and Self-Reconstruction Nationalism in Korea, 1896­1937 fills the lacuna somewhat, but this work is hampered by its limited scope and an overly intellectualist treatment of the Protestants. Park's effort in this respect, therefore, is laudable, but even here he is too ham-handed to be very helpful--as he lumps together Protestant-turnedCommunist Yi Tonghwi, minimally Protestant Kim Ku, and bona-fide Protestant Cho Mansik all under the same category. Timothy S. Lee Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University Eye on Korea: An Insider Account of Korean-American Relations, by James V. Young. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2003. 188 pp., notes, index. $39.95 cloth. Korea remains at the center of security concerns in Northeast Asia more than a decade after the Cold War ended. Since October 2002, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Eye on Korea: An Insider Account of Korean-American Relations (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 27 (1)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1529
Publisher site
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Abstract

book reviews Han'guk k1ndae ch0ngch'i sasangsa y0ngu: minjok up'a 1i sill0k yangs0ng undongnon (A Study of Modern Korean Political Thought: Right-wing Nationalists' Self-Strengthening Movement)--one cannot fail to appreciate the significance of Protestant figures such as An Ch'angho and Cho Mansik, or the March First Movement. Yet little is made of the fact that Protestantism provided ideological inspiration and institutional bases for these men and the movement. Kenneth M. Wells's New God, New Nation: Protestants and Self-Reconstruction Nationalism in Korea, 1896­1937 fills the lacuna somewhat, but this work is hampered by its limited scope and an overly intellectualist treatment of the Protestants. Park's effort in this respect, therefore, is laudable, but even here he is too ham-handed to be very helpful--as he lumps together Protestant-turnedCommunist Yi Tonghwi, minimally Protestant Kim Ku, and bona-fide Protestant Cho Mansik all under the same category. Timothy S. Lee Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University Eye on Korea: An Insider Account of Korean-American Relations, by James V. Young. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2003. 188 pp., notes, index. $39.95 cloth. Korea remains at the center of security concerns in Northeast Asia more than a decade after the Cold War ended. Since October 2002,

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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