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Ethnologie et Architecture: Le Centre Culturel Tjibaou, une realisation de Renzo Piano (review)

Ethnologie et Architecture: Le Centre Culturel Tjibaou, une realisation de Renzo Piano (review) book reviews in that the cultural practices labeled polyrhetoric work to interrogate monorhetorical (mis)understandings. In the final chapter, Wood documents many forms of Hawaiian nationalist sovereignty assertions proliferating through the world of cyberspace to indicate the possibilities that may be created through new forms of technology and media. One troubling aspect of the book is that "Hawaiian voices" are too often reduced to merely "alternative rhetoric" rather than recognized for what they may promise in the way of epistemological resources and their corresponding implications. Looking to the fundamental Hawaiian cultural principle found in the saying, `ölelo i ke ola, `ölelo i ka make (in the word, life, in the word, death) enunciations themselves are alive and capable of producing multiple effects, including creating reality. I came to this text from a broad interdisciplinary perspective and found that overall, Wood's book offers very strong critical analyses of dominant cultural productions and discursive struggles, with a central focus on the contested terrain of representation. Displacing Natives is an excellent choice for courses that focus on US colonialism, Hawaiian Studies, literary and visual representations of indigenous peoples, and ethnic studies. In this time of `ena makani (stormy winds) it is important http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Ethnologie et Architecture: Le Centre Culturel Tjibaou, une realisation de Renzo Piano (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 14 (1) – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book reviews in that the cultural practices labeled polyrhetoric work to interrogate monorhetorical (mis)understandings. In the final chapter, Wood documents many forms of Hawaiian nationalist sovereignty assertions proliferating through the world of cyberspace to indicate the possibilities that may be created through new forms of technology and media. One troubling aspect of the book is that "Hawaiian voices" are too often reduced to merely "alternative rhetoric" rather than recognized for what they may promise in the way of epistemological resources and their corresponding implications. Looking to the fundamental Hawaiian cultural principle found in the saying, `ölelo i ke ola, `ölelo i ka make (in the word, life, in the word, death) enunciations themselves are alive and capable of producing multiple effects, including creating reality. I came to this text from a broad interdisciplinary perspective and found that overall, Wood's book offers very strong critical analyses of dominant cultural productions and discursive struggles, with a central focus on the contested terrain of representation. Displacing Natives is an excellent choice for courses that focus on US colonialism, Hawaiian Studies, literary and visual representations of indigenous peoples, and ethnic studies. In this time of `ena makani (stormy winds) it is important

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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