Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Empire and Identity in Guizhou: Local Resistance to Qing Expansion by Jodi L. Weinstein (review)

Empire and Identity in Guizhou: Local Resistance to Qing Expansion by Jodi L. Weinstein (review) tion); unnecessary repetitions of terminology and bibliographical detail; misspellings of writers' names; and problems in vocabulary, grammar, and punctuation. Despite these drawbacks, readers may look forward with confidence to the author's continuing enthusiasm for and engagement with modern Chinese literature of this period. Bonnie S. McDougall Bonnie S. McDougall is a visiting professor in the School of Languages and Cultures at the University of Sydney, specializing in modern Chinese literature and translation studies. Jodi L. Weinstein. Empire and Identity in Guizhou: Local Resistance to Qing Expansion. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2014. xiii, 217 pp. Paperback $30.00, isbn 978-0-295-99327-0. Beginning in the eighteenth century, Qing rulers sought to establish direct administration over southwestern China by replacing the native chieftains or tusi with state officials, a process known as gaitu guiliu. In the past three decades, the accessibility of primary documents in both central and provincial archives and the recent publication of large numbers of Qing archives as well as ethnographic accounts have allowed historians to examine the dynamic interactions between the imperial center and ethnic frontiers, as the gaitu guiliu was implemented. Recent works, which focus on the indigenous response to Qing territorial sovereignty, include John Herman's Amid http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Empire and Identity in Guizhou: Local Resistance to Qing Expansion by Jodi L. Weinstein (review)

China Review International , Volume 20 (1) – Jan 22, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/empire-and-identity-in-guizhou-local-resistance-to-qing-expansion-by-QRtAS3s8DE
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

tion); unnecessary repetitions of terminology and bibliographical detail; misspellings of writers' names; and problems in vocabulary, grammar, and punctuation. Despite these drawbacks, readers may look forward with confidence to the author's continuing enthusiasm for and engagement with modern Chinese literature of this period. Bonnie S. McDougall Bonnie S. McDougall is a visiting professor in the School of Languages and Cultures at the University of Sydney, specializing in modern Chinese literature and translation studies. Jodi L. Weinstein. Empire and Identity in Guizhou: Local Resistance to Qing Expansion. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2014. xiii, 217 pp. Paperback $30.00, isbn 978-0-295-99327-0. Beginning in the eighteenth century, Qing rulers sought to establish direct administration over southwestern China by replacing the native chieftains or tusi with state officials, a process known as gaitu guiliu. In the past three decades, the accessibility of primary documents in both central and provincial archives and the recent publication of large numbers of Qing archives as well as ethnographic accounts have allowed historians to examine the dynamic interactions between the imperial center and ethnic frontiers, as the gaitu guiliu was implemented. Recent works, which focus on the indigenous response to Qing territorial sovereignty, include John Herman's Amid

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 22, 2013

There are no references for this article.