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Dynamics of State Formation: Europe and India Compared (review)

Dynamics of State Formation: Europe and India Compared (review) Book Reviews Dynamics of State Formation: Europe and India Compared. Edited by martin doornbos and sudipta kaviraj. London: Sage, 1998. Pp. 434. $36.00 (cloth). This collection of sixteen essays (minus an index) represents a selection of papers originally presented at an Indo-Dutch seminar, held in New Delhi in March 1990, on the comparative study of state formation processes in India and Europe. The book is divided into six sections. The papers in the first section attempt to plot the historical setting and trajectories of state formation in India and Europe. They highlight the fact that such processes have taken divergent paths in India and Europe, being based on very different human experiences, traditions, institutions, cultures, and histories. Thus, S. N. Eisenstadt and Harriet Hartman conclude that in India, over time, there emerged no conception of statehood as a distinct ontological entity and little reconstruction took place in the political and economic arenas. This was unlike Europe, where from the Middle Ages onwards, new institutional areas such as the formation of the cultural and political centers of the nation state and civil society begin to emerge. The papers by Satish Saberwal and Jan Heesterman analyze the colonial state in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Dynamics of State Formation: Europe and India Compared (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (2) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews Dynamics of State Formation: Europe and India Compared. Edited by martin doornbos and sudipta kaviraj. London: Sage, 1998. Pp. 434. $36.00 (cloth). This collection of sixteen essays (minus an index) represents a selection of papers originally presented at an Indo-Dutch seminar, held in New Delhi in March 1990, on the comparative study of state formation processes in India and Europe. The book is divided into six sections. The papers in the first section attempt to plot the historical setting and trajectories of state formation in India and Europe. They highlight the fact that such processes have taken divergent paths in India and Europe, being based on very different human experiences, traditions, institutions, cultures, and histories. Thus, S. N. Eisenstadt and Harriet Hartman conclude that in India, over time, there emerged no conception of statehood as a distinct ontological entity and little reconstruction took place in the political and economic arenas. This was unlike Europe, where from the Middle Ages onwards, new institutional areas such as the formation of the cultural and political centers of the nation state and civil society begin to emerge. The papers by Satish Saberwal and Jan Heesterman analyze the colonial state in

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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