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Clause structure and adjuncts in Austronesian languages (review)

Clause structure and adjuncts in Austronesian languages (review) Hans-Martin Gärtner, Paul Law, and Joachim Sabel, eds. 2006. Clause structure and adjuncts in Austronesian languages. Berlin/ New York: Mouton de Gruyter. 332 pp. ISBN 978-3-11-019005-2. $109.00, hardcover. Just as teenagers divide the world into jocks, nerds, goths, preps, townies, posers, and so on, linguists tend to categorize languages in broad strokes by what is best known about them: Bantu languages are defined by applicatives and tones, Slavic languages by palatalization and aspect, Native American languages by polysynthesis and attrition, and so on. Ask a linguist who does not work on Austronesian what he or she knows about these languages and you are likely to hear about nasal substitution, infixation, verb-initial word order, articulated systems of grammatical voice, or restrictions on movement. Any book that is addressed to the general public, not just to Austronesianists, and that takes the reader beyond these staple topics fills an important gap. The book reviewed here does just that and more. If pressed to name its goals, I would identify them as twofold: to make issues that at first sight may seem parochial to Austronesianists relevant to the entire field by identifying the theoretical challenges they pose, and to move the analysis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Clause structure and adjuncts in Austronesian languages (review)

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 48 (2) – Jan 28, 2009

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-9421
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Abstract

Hans-Martin Gärtner, Paul Law, and Joachim Sabel, eds. 2006. Clause structure and adjuncts in Austronesian languages. Berlin/ New York: Mouton de Gruyter. 332 pp. ISBN 978-3-11-019005-2. $109.00, hardcover. Just as teenagers divide the world into jocks, nerds, goths, preps, townies, posers, and so on, linguists tend to categorize languages in broad strokes by what is best known about them: Bantu languages are defined by applicatives and tones, Slavic languages by palatalization and aspect, Native American languages by polysynthesis and attrition, and so on. Ask a linguist who does not work on Austronesian what he or she knows about these languages and you are likely to hear about nasal substitution, infixation, verb-initial word order, articulated systems of grammatical voice, or restrictions on movement. Any book that is addressed to the general public, not just to Austronesianists, and that takes the reader beyond these staple topics fills an important gap. The book reviewed here does just that and more. If pressed to name its goals, I would identify them as twofold: to make issues that at first sight may seem parochial to Austronesianists relevant to the entire field by identifying the theoretical challenges they pose, and to move the analysis

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 28, 2009

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