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Chinese Modernity and the Individual Psyche ed. by Andrew Kipnis (review)

Chinese Modernity and the Individual Psyche ed. by Andrew Kipnis (review) China Review International: Vol. 20, Nos. 1 & 2, 2013 These problems aside, Keenan succeeds in highlighting the dualistic relationship between Neo-Confucianism and the imperial state. By emphasizing the role of private academies in promoting the Neo-Confucian vision of self-cultivation and local self-rule, he demonstrates the importance of Neo-Confucianism as an intellectual movement that shaped higher education in late imperial China. Above all, he reminds us that Neo-Confucianism is both a philosophy and a daily practice in everyday life. Tze-ki Hon Tze-ki Hon is a professor of history specializing in the Yijing commentaries and modern Chinese intellectual history, at the State University of New York at Geneseo. Notes 1. See Tu Wei-ming, Centrality and Commonality: An Essay on Confucian Religiousness (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1989). The Doctrine of the Mean is one of the Four Books of the Neo-Confucian canon. The other three books are the Great Learning, the Analects, and the Mencius. 2. Daniel K. Gardner, Chu Hsi and the Ta-hsueh: Neo-Confucian Reflection on the Confucian Canon (Cambridge, MA: Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University, 1986). 3. Peter K. Bol, "This Culture of Ours": Intellectual Transitions in T'ang and Sung China (Stanford, CA: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Chinese Modernity and the Individual Psyche ed. by Andrew Kipnis (review)

China Review International , Volume 20 (1) – Jan 22, 2013

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Abstract

China Review International: Vol. 20, Nos. 1 & 2, 2013 These problems aside, Keenan succeeds in highlighting the dualistic relationship between Neo-Confucianism and the imperial state. By emphasizing the role of private academies in promoting the Neo-Confucian vision of self-cultivation and local self-rule, he demonstrates the importance of Neo-Confucianism as an intellectual movement that shaped higher education in late imperial China. Above all, he reminds us that Neo-Confucianism is both a philosophy and a daily practice in everyday life. Tze-ki Hon Tze-ki Hon is a professor of history specializing in the Yijing commentaries and modern Chinese intellectual history, at the State University of New York at Geneseo. Notes 1. See Tu Wei-ming, Centrality and Commonality: An Essay on Confucian Religiousness (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1989). The Doctrine of the Mean is one of the Four Books of the Neo-Confucian canon. The other three books are the Great Learning, the Analects, and the Mencius. 2. Daniel K. Gardner, Chu Hsi and the Ta-hsueh: Neo-Confucian Reflection on the Confucian Canon (Cambridge, MA: Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University, 1986). 3. Peter K. Bol, "This Culture of Ours": Intellectual Transitions in T'ang and Sung China (Stanford, CA:

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 22, 2013

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