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Changing Meanings of Citizenship in Modern China (review)

Changing Meanings of Citizenship in Modern China (review) Reviews 95 Merle Goldman and Elizabeth J. Perry, editors. Changing Meanings of Citizenship in Modern China. Harvard Contemporary China series, 13. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002. Hardcover, isbn 0­674­ 00766­2. Paperback, isbn 0­674­00843­x. This volume on citizenship in modern China originated in a conference at Harvard University in 1999 and includes thirteen essays whose topics span the twentieth century. Although definitions vary somewhat throughout, citizenship is generally understood here--and elsewhere--as the benefits or rights and obligations attached to membership in a political community. As an analytical concept, then, citizenship necessarily focuses attention directly on the changing ties between the state and the members of society. While the specific evolution, conceptualization, and practice of citizenship may vary across time and place, it is a category that is common to modern nation-states and is therefore a promising category for the empirical and comparative study of state-society relations. Overall, this welcome collection provides a rich and much-needed examination of state-society relations in twentieth-century China that highlights both change and continuity across regimes. The book is divided into three sections: (1) "Imperial and Republican China" (five chapters), (2) "The People's Republic" (seven chapters), and (3) "Taiwan" (one chapter), with a number http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Changing Meanings of Citizenship in Modern China (review)

China Review International , Volume 11 (1) – Jan 18, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
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Abstract

Reviews 95 Merle Goldman and Elizabeth J. Perry, editors. Changing Meanings of Citizenship in Modern China. Harvard Contemporary China series, 13. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002. Hardcover, isbn 0­674­ 00766­2. Paperback, isbn 0­674­00843­x. This volume on citizenship in modern China originated in a conference at Harvard University in 1999 and includes thirteen essays whose topics span the twentieth century. Although definitions vary somewhat throughout, citizenship is generally understood here--and elsewhere--as the benefits or rights and obligations attached to membership in a political community. As an analytical concept, then, citizenship necessarily focuses attention directly on the changing ties between the state and the members of society. While the specific evolution, conceptualization, and practice of citizenship may vary across time and place, it is a category that is common to modern nation-states and is therefore a promising category for the empirical and comparative study of state-society relations. Overall, this welcome collection provides a rich and much-needed examination of state-society relations in twentieth-century China that highlights both change and continuity across regimes. The book is divided into three sections: (1) "Imperial and Republican China" (five chapters), (2) "The People's Republic" (seven chapters), and (3) "Taiwan" (one chapter), with a number

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 18, 2004

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