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Buddhists and Christians through Comparative Theology and Solidarity (review)

Buddhists and Christians through Comparative Theology and Solidarity (review) BOOK REVIEWS keep her vows and live in an "empty valley with no people," she asks for "women friends with a similar religion" (p. 178). Nevertheless, in that same prayer, she still writes that a woman's body is a ground for samsara. The final chapter narrates her death and cremation. Before her death, her meditation master told her that she did not need to do more meditation practices because she had fully protected her vows and commitments, thus contradicting the common belief that enlightenment in a female body was impossible. She died when a wooden beam broke and struck her in the head during a religious ritual. After her death, the kinds of signs of accomplishment familiar to readers of Tibetan Buddhist narratives occur. Her body remained in meditation posture for seven days and her cremation fire ignited spontaneously, producing rainbow colored flames. When the crematory was later opened, she had left relics behind. These are the same signs of accomplishment that often end the life narrative of a male saint. Why the difference between these two narratives? The folk culture is the same in both cases; everyone agrees that female rebirth is unenviable and people like Orgyan http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Buddhists and Christians through Comparative Theology and Solidarity (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 6, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS keep her vows and live in an "empty valley with no people," she asks for "women friends with a similar religion" (p. 178). Nevertheless, in that same prayer, she still writes that a woman's body is a ground for samsara. The final chapter narrates her death and cremation. Before her death, her meditation master told her that she did not need to do more meditation practices because she had fully protected her vows and commitments, thus contradicting the common belief that enlightenment in a female body was impossible. She died when a wooden beam broke and struck her in the head during a religious ritual. After her death, the kinds of signs of accomplishment familiar to readers of Tibetan Buddhist narratives occur. Her body remained in meditation posture for seven days and her cremation fire ignited spontaneously, producing rainbow colored flames. When the crematory was later opened, she had left relics behind. These are the same signs of accomplishment that often end the life narrative of a male saint. Why the difference between these two narratives? The folk culture is the same in both cases; everyone agrees that female rebirth is unenviable and people like Orgyan

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 6, 2006

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