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Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America (review)

Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America (review) korean studies, vol. 27 Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America. By Ji-Yeon Yuh. New York: New York University Press, 2002. xvii, 283 pp. $26.00 cloth, $19.00 paper. Over the past several decades, Korean military brides have received unsavory media coverage. They have been portrayed as former prostitutes and victims of their husbands' abuse. This negative stereotype, the "shadow," is common in Korea as well as America. Ji-Yeon Yuh attempts to move analysis beyond this shadow and provide a more nuanced perception of the approximately 100,000 Korean military brides who immigrated to the United States since the 1950s by exploring the personal lives of these women. Beyond the Shadow of Camptown is a readable and poignant piece of scholarship. Much of Yuh's research is based on interviews with 16 military brides and observations of another 150 over the course of two and a half years in the mid-1990s. Her reliance on a handful of interviews offers a sense of continuity, as the reader follows the lives of these women from one chapter to the next. Yuh divides her book into six chapters that whisk the reader from the women's childhood, to the meeting of their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 27 (1)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1529
Publisher site
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Abstract

korean studies, vol. 27 Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America. By Ji-Yeon Yuh. New York: New York University Press, 2002. xvii, 283 pp. $26.00 cloth, $19.00 paper. Over the past several decades, Korean military brides have received unsavory media coverage. They have been portrayed as former prostitutes and victims of their husbands' abuse. This negative stereotype, the "shadow," is common in Korea as well as America. Ji-Yeon Yuh attempts to move analysis beyond this shadow and provide a more nuanced perception of the approximately 100,000 Korean military brides who immigrated to the United States since the 1950s by exploring the personal lives of these women. Beyond the Shadow of Camptown is a readable and poignant piece of scholarship. Much of Yuh's research is based on interviews with 16 military brides and observations of another 150 over the course of two and a half years in the mid-1990s. Her reliance on a handful of interviews offers a sense of continuity, as the reader follows the lives of these women from one chapter to the next. Yuh divides her book into six chapters that whisk the reader from the women's childhood, to the meeting of their

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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