Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Between Memory and Prediction: Recasting a Mountain Village in Yi Sang's "Ennui"

Between Memory and Prediction: Recasting a Mountain Village in Yi Sang's "Ennui" by John M. Frankl the so-called "national disgrace of the kyngsul year ()," which lasted from 2010 marked the 100th year since the onset of Japanese colonial rule over Korea, 1910 to 1945. Coincidentally, it was also the 100-year anniversary of the birth of Yi Sang (née Kim Haegyng, 1910-1937). Both are experiencing a renewed interest in academe and the media, and both are often "read" more in terms of present-day political agendas than in their own historical and literary contexts. And while comments on the Japanese colonial period in general are far beyond the scope of this essay, I am happy to report that, despite the extra attention being lavished upon him, Yi Sang remains an enigma. It is with this understanding, and the appropriate attendant humility, that I below explore a certain small portion of his life and work. i Sang spent the great majority of his life in Seoul. His brief sojourn to rural northern Korea in 1935 lasted only three weeks, and represented only his second trip outside the capital. Despite its brevity, at least six separate essays emerged from this journey. As might be expected, the contents of the essays do share a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture University of Hawai'I Press

Between Memory and Prediction: Recasting a Mountain Village in Yi Sang's "Ennui"

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/between-memory-and-prediction-recasting-a-mountain-village-in-yi-sang-3yiI4ay8hn
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1944-6500
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

by John M. Frankl the so-called "national disgrace of the kyngsul year ()," which lasted from 2010 marked the 100th year since the onset of Japanese colonial rule over Korea, 1910 to 1945. Coincidentally, it was also the 100-year anniversary of the birth of Yi Sang (née Kim Haegyng, 1910-1937). Both are experiencing a renewed interest in academe and the media, and both are often "read" more in terms of present-day political agendas than in their own historical and literary contexts. And while comments on the Japanese colonial period in general are far beyond the scope of this essay, I am happy to report that, despite the extra attention being lavished upon him, Yi Sang remains an enigma. It is with this understanding, and the appropriate attendant humility, that I below explore a certain small portion of his life and work. i Sang spent the great majority of his life in Seoul. His brief sojourn to rural northern Korea in 1935 lasted only three weeks, and represented only his second trip outside the capital. Despite its brevity, at least six separate essays emerged from this journey. As might be expected, the contents of the essays do share a

Journal

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & CultureUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 23, 2011

There are no references for this article.