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Advertising to Children in China (review)

Advertising to Children in China (review) Reviews 41 will remain an important work in the studies of contemporary China's transformation as well as postcolonial cultural development in the face of the currently perceived trend of globalization. Yinong Xu Yinong Xu is a senior lecturer in architecture at the University of New South Wales, specializing in the history of architecture, urbanization, and gardens in China. notes 1. For insightful discussions of this issue, see Frederick W. Mote, "The Cosmological Gulf between China and the West," in David C. Buxhaum and Frederick W. Mote, eds., Transition and Permanence: Chinese History and Culture (University of Washington Press, 1972), pp. 3­21; Mote, Intellectual Foundations of China, 2nd ed. (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1989), pp. 12­25; and David L. Hall and Roger T. Ames, Thinking Through Confucius (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1987). 2. Discussions of this by Craig Clunas, in his Fruitful Sites: Garden Culture in Ming Dynasty China (London: Reakton Books, 1996), pp. 178­189, are very helpful. 3. Here Bruun cites Linda A. Walton, "Southern Sung Academies and the Construction of Sacred Space," in Wen-hsin Yeh, ed., Landscape, Culture, and Power in Chinese Society (Berkeley, CA: Institute of East Asian Studies, 1998), pp. 23­24. 4. Andrew http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Advertising to Children in China (review)

China Review International , Volume 11 (1) – Jan 18, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews 41 will remain an important work in the studies of contemporary China's transformation as well as postcolonial cultural development in the face of the currently perceived trend of globalization. Yinong Xu Yinong Xu is a senior lecturer in architecture at the University of New South Wales, specializing in the history of architecture, urbanization, and gardens in China. notes 1. For insightful discussions of this issue, see Frederick W. Mote, "The Cosmological Gulf between China and the West," in David C. Buxhaum and Frederick W. Mote, eds., Transition and Permanence: Chinese History and Culture (University of Washington Press, 1972), pp. 3­21; Mote, Intellectual Foundations of China, 2nd ed. (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1989), pp. 12­25; and David L. Hall and Roger T. Ames, Thinking Through Confucius (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1987). 2. Discussions of this by Craig Clunas, in his Fruitful Sites: Garden Culture in Ming Dynasty China (London: Reakton Books, 1996), pp. 178­189, are very helpful. 3. Here Bruun cites Linda A. Walton, "Southern Sung Academies and the Construction of Sacred Space," in Wen-hsin Yeh, ed., Landscape, Culture, and Power in Chinese Society (Berkeley, CA: Institute of East Asian Studies, 1998), pp. 23­24. 4. Andrew

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 18, 2004

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