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22nd Niwano Peace Prize Commemorative Address

22nd Niwano Peace Prize Commemorative Address NEWS AND VIEWS Tokyo, November 5, 2005 Hans Küng Tübingen University There are dreams that never come true, and on the other hand one can experience realities in life which one would never have dreamt of. Indeed, when I first traveled to Japan as a young professor in 1964 and later when I visited Rissho Kosei-kai headquarters and had the privilege to meet founder Nikkyo Niwano in 1982, it never came to my mind that I might once stand here as a laureate of the prestigious Niwano Peace Prize. This prize is an extraordinary honor for me and I am deeply grateful to the Niwano Peace Foundation for having selected me as this year's laureate. I consider this distinction as a threefold encouragement: 1. For me personally as an acknowledgment of my life-long activities for ecumenism among the Christian churches and for dialogue among religions. 2. For the Global Ethic Foundation for intercultural and interreligious research, education, and encounter, of which I am the president. 3. For all those around the world who strive for a global ethic as a basis of harmony among human beings and thus a more peaceful world. I receive this prize precisely for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

22nd Niwano Peace Prize Commemorative Address

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 6, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

NEWS AND VIEWS Tokyo, November 5, 2005 Hans Küng Tübingen University There are dreams that never come true, and on the other hand one can experience realities in life which one would never have dreamt of. Indeed, when I first traveled to Japan as a young professor in 1964 and later when I visited Rissho Kosei-kai headquarters and had the privilege to meet founder Nikkyo Niwano in 1982, it never came to my mind that I might once stand here as a laureate of the prestigious Niwano Peace Prize. This prize is an extraordinary honor for me and I am deeply grateful to the Niwano Peace Foundation for having selected me as this year's laureate. I consider this distinction as a threefold encouragement: 1. For me personally as an acknowledgment of my life-long activities for ecumenism among the Christian churches and for dialogue among religions. 2. For the Global Ethic Foundation for intercultural and interreligious research, education, and encounter, of which I am the president. 3. For all those around the world who strive for a global ethic as a basis of harmony among human beings and thus a more peaceful world. I receive this prize precisely for

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 6, 2006

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