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Growing American Rubber: Strategic Plants and the Politics of National Security (review)

Growing American Rubber: Strategic Plants and the Politics of National Security (review) Book Reviews To say that The Lumberman's Frontier is a well-researched, thorough work understates Thomas Cox's achievement. The citations and source notes take up nearly one-third of the printed pages, and the information in the citations alone takes the reader on mini-adventures. Cox is to be commended for acquiring and weaving together hundreds of primary and secondary sources into a massive yet meaningful national history, but the reader's memorable journey is a bit tedious at times. Describing how the lumberman's frontier reached each region of the country--and Cox seems to have been everywhere the timber industry developed in the U.S.-- highlighting the resources and sequence of events within each area, the reader will periodically feel a sense of déjà vu with only the names of businessmen and public officials having changed from one region to the next. This criticism, notwithstanding, Cox suggests that Americans may never decide who should control the nation's forests or how forestland should be used. Indeed, although government management of the forests has alleviated locals' fear of corporate misbehavior, these rural residents and forest dwellers insist they have the right to act as they please (e.g., hunt, fish, harvest logs) and they now must http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southwestern Historical Quarterly Texas State Historical Association

Growing American Rubber: Strategic Plants and the Politics of National Security (review)

Southwestern Historical Quarterly , Volume 115 (1) – Jul 15, 2011

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Publisher
Texas State Historical Association
Copyright
Copyright © Texas State Historical Association
ISSN
1558-9560
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews To say that The Lumberman's Frontier is a well-researched, thorough work understates Thomas Cox's achievement. The citations and source notes take up nearly one-third of the printed pages, and the information in the citations alone takes the reader on mini-adventures. Cox is to be commended for acquiring and weaving together hundreds of primary and secondary sources into a massive yet meaningful national history, but the reader's memorable journey is a bit tedious at times. Describing how the lumberman's frontier reached each region of the country--and Cox seems to have been everywhere the timber industry developed in the U.S.-- highlighting the resources and sequence of events within each area, the reader will periodically feel a sense of déjà vu with only the names of businessmen and public officials having changed from one region to the next. This criticism, notwithstanding, Cox suggests that Americans may never decide who should control the nation's forests or how forestland should be used. Indeed, although government management of the forests has alleviated locals' fear of corporate misbehavior, these rural residents and forest dwellers insist they have the right to act as they please (e.g., hunt, fish, harvest logs) and they now must

Journal

Southwestern Historical QuarterlyTexas State Historical Association

Published: Jul 15, 2011

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