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The Supreme Court and Benign Elite Democracy in Japan (review)

The Supreme Court and Benign Elite Democracy in Japan (review) women who want to enter managerial tracks within firms have equivalent chances of doing so, however, we have no way of telling how big a role women's preference plays in shaping the unequal distributions of men and women across the different career tracks. Despite the drawbacks discussed here, Tachibanaki's book is impressive in the amount of information it contains. Readers might not agree with some of his interpretations, arguments, or policy recommendations, but the statistics he brings from a wide range of data sources should be helpful to all scholars and students interested in various aspects of Japanese women's lives. Perhaps more important, Tachibanaki calls attention to a topic that has long been neglected: differentiation within women. An increasing amount of research on Western societies has shown that women as a group are far from homogeneous and that their economic well-being varies widely by their education, occupation, and family status, among other things. Tachibanaki's book demonstrates that Japanese women are no exception. Thus, future research on inequality in Japan must pay attention to gaps not only between the two gender groups but also those within each group. The Supreme Court and Benign Elite Democracy in Japan. By Hiroshi http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

The Supreme Court and Benign Elite Democracy in Japan (review)

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

women who want to enter managerial tracks within firms have equivalent chances of doing so, however, we have no way of telling how big a role women's preference plays in shaping the unequal distributions of men and women across the different career tracks. Despite the drawbacks discussed here, Tachibanaki's book is impressive in the amount of information it contains. Readers might not agree with some of his interpretations, arguments, or policy recommendations, but the statistics he brings from a wide range of data sources should be helpful to all scholars and students interested in various aspects of Japanese women's lives. Perhaps more important, Tachibanaki calls attention to a topic that has long been neglected: differentiation within women. An increasing amount of research on Western societies has shown that women as a group are far from homogeneous and that their economic well-being varies widely by their education, occupation, and family status, among other things. Tachibanaki's book demonstrates that Japanese women are no exception. Thus, future research on inequality in Japan must pay attention to gaps not only between the two gender groups but also those within each group. The Supreme Court and Benign Elite Democracy in Japan. By Hiroshi

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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