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The Rise and Fall of Japan's LDP: Political Party Organizations as Historical Institutions. (review)

The Rise and Fall of Japan's LDP: Political Party Organizations as Historical Institutions. (review) ment seem more relevant. Arguably, the end of the cold war, not electoral reform, opened up the foreign policy debate by destabilizing the previous equilibrium. Moreover, while foreign policy did not attract the interest of individual LDP politicians under the 1955 system, it was a major cleavage between the left and the right. Finally, the chapter on foreign policy relies extensively on examples from Koizumi Jun'ichiro's time in office. It is only ¯ now becoming clearer with several weaker prime ministers who have followed in Koizumi's footsteps that the powers of the prime minister might be more related to the individual in office than the actual rule changes put into place. Certainly the rule changes (the administrative reforms in the late 1990s and early 2000s more than electoral reform) have created the potential for greater prime ministerial leadership, but this has not always translated into an effective party leader able to devise a policy platform that even approaches the concerns of the median voter. Indeed, this deficiency could be related to a period of adjustment where politicians and parties are still learning how to adapt to the relatively new electoral system rules, but one should remain wary of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

The Rise and Fall of Japan's LDP: Political Party Organizations as Historical Institutions. (review)

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

ment seem more relevant. Arguably, the end of the cold war, not electoral reform, opened up the foreign policy debate by destabilizing the previous equilibrium. Moreover, while foreign policy did not attract the interest of individual LDP politicians under the 1955 system, it was a major cleavage between the left and the right. Finally, the chapter on foreign policy relies extensively on examples from Koizumi Jun'ichiro's time in office. It is only ¯ now becoming clearer with several weaker prime ministers who have followed in Koizumi's footsteps that the powers of the prime minister might be more related to the individual in office than the actual rule changes put into place. Certainly the rule changes (the administrative reforms in the late 1990s and early 2000s more than electoral reform) have created the potential for greater prime ministerial leadership, but this has not always translated into an effective party leader able to devise a policy platform that even approaches the concerns of the median voter. Indeed, this deficiency could be related to a period of adjustment where politicians and parties are still learning how to adapt to the relatively new electoral system rules, but one should remain wary of

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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