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The New Paradox for Japanese Women: Greater Choice, Greater Inequality (review)

The New Paradox for Japanese Women: Greater Choice, Greater Inequality (review) this could have been developed further; ironically, many of Koizumi's opponents in the Liberal Democratic Party toed the line on the policymaking front because they understood his unusual appeal amongst the voters and hence ability to keep their party in power. My criticisms aside, this is an important resource for students of Japanese politics and a must-read for anyone interested in grasping the significance of the Koizumi phenomenon. The New Paradox for Japanese Women: Greater Choice, Greater Inequality. By Tachibanaki Toshiaki; translated by Mary E. Foster. International House Press, Tokyo, 2010. xx, 290 pages. ¥2,858. Reviewed by Wei-hsin Yu University of Texas at Austin Researchers on Japan have been paying attention to women in that society for a few decades. Through numerous studies by anthropologists, sociologists, and occasionally economists, we have learned that Japan has arguably the highest degree of gender differentiation among more industrialized countries. With most men attending four-year universities and a large proportion of women in junior colleges, Japan's level of gender segregation in higher education has been greater than that in countries of similar levels of economic development. Research has also shown considerable gender gaps in earnings, promotion opportunities, and employment status. As many http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

The New Paradox for Japanese Women: Greater Choice, Greater Inequality (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 38 (1) – Feb 1, 2012

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

this could have been developed further; ironically, many of Koizumi's opponents in the Liberal Democratic Party toed the line on the policymaking front because they understood his unusual appeal amongst the voters and hence ability to keep their party in power. My criticisms aside, this is an important resource for students of Japanese politics and a must-read for anyone interested in grasping the significance of the Koizumi phenomenon. The New Paradox for Japanese Women: Greater Choice, Greater Inequality. By Tachibanaki Toshiaki; translated by Mary E. Foster. International House Press, Tokyo, 2010. xx, 290 pages. ¥2,858. Reviewed by Wei-hsin Yu University of Texas at Austin Researchers on Japan have been paying attention to women in that society for a few decades. Through numerous studies by anthropologists, sociologists, and occasionally economists, we have learned that Japan has arguably the highest degree of gender differentiation among more industrialized countries. With most men attending four-year universities and a large proportion of women in junior colleges, Japan's level of gender segregation in higher education has been greater than that in countries of similar levels of economic development. Research has also shown considerable gender gaps in earnings, promotion opportunities, and employment status. As many

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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