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The Empty Museum: Western Cultures and the Artistic Field in Modern Japan (review)

The Empty Museum: Western Cultures and the Artistic Field in Modern Japan (review) Journal of Japanese Studies 38:1 (2012) the discussion is detailed and sympathetic. This excellent chapter points up most starkly the problem of recycling work from 2001, as it is precisely over this period that the fujoshi emerged as a self-conscious identity (not dependent on otaku identity). In all, the thread produced by these three chapters is so strong that it overshadows the organization of the volume by print fiction and anime, and hints at what the volume could have been. Azuma Hiroki's "SF as Hamlet" is interesting in that it is critical of the genre, in contrast to the generally celebratory tone of the volume, and claims that science fiction stands in relation to failed totalizing philosophies of the nineteenth-century like Hamlet muttering about how best to continue the project of a slain father (that is to say, Hegelian philosophy). The piece rests on the intuitive appeal of that image, though, and contains a summary of the history of philosophy which is simply inexplicable. I have been an admirer of Azuma since his Critical Space days, but this is not the best introduction to his work. In conclusion, this volume is an interesting summary that hits a market http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

The Empty Museum: Western Cultures and the Artistic Field in Modern Japan (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 38 (1) – Feb 1, 2012

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

Journal of Japanese Studies 38:1 (2012) the discussion is detailed and sympathetic. This excellent chapter points up most starkly the problem of recycling work from 2001, as it is precisely over this period that the fujoshi emerged as a self-conscious identity (not dependent on otaku identity). In all, the thread produced by these three chapters is so strong that it overshadows the organization of the volume by print fiction and anime, and hints at what the volume could have been. Azuma Hiroki's "SF as Hamlet" is interesting in that it is critical of the genre, in contrast to the generally celebratory tone of the volume, and claims that science fiction stands in relation to failed totalizing philosophies of the nineteenth-century like Hamlet muttering about how best to continue the project of a slain father (that is to say, Hegelian philosophy). The piece rests on the intuitive appeal of that image, though, and contains a summary of the history of philosophy which is simply inexplicable. I have been an admirer of Azuma since his Critical Space days, but this is not the best introduction to his work. In conclusion, this volume is an interesting summary that hits a market

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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