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Soft Power in Japan-China Relations: State, Sub-state and Non-state Relations (review)

Soft Power in Japan-China Relations: State, Sub-state and Non-state Relations (review) The model and Chung's argument suggest that state-centered citizenship is becoming less important. This last issue falls outside the parameters of this study, but Chung's argument certainly raises it as worthy of attention. On their own, Borderline Japan: Foreigners and Frontier Controls in the Postwar Era and Immigration and Citizenship in Japan are each important contributions to research on immigration and citizenship politics and policies. Taken together, they provide comprehensive coverage of the historical development of Japan's immigration policies and politics, changes over time, and the current state of affairs, and they also encourage us to anticipate Japan's future. Soft Power in Japan-China Relations: State, Sub-state and Non-state Relations. By Utpal Vyas. Routledge, London, 2011. xiv, 202 pages. $84.95. Reviewed by Marie Söderberg Stockholm School of Economics The complex and tricky relationship between Japan and China is extremely important for the future of Asia. For this reason, research on this topic has increased tremendously in recent years. With the growing Chinese economy and a more outward-oriented China taking an active part in international relations, the power balance has changed, and this is affecting politics. Some researchers have focused on the trilateral relationship among the United States, Japan, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Soft Power in Japan-China Relations: State, Sub-state and Non-state Relations (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 38 (1) – Feb 1, 2012

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

The model and Chung's argument suggest that state-centered citizenship is becoming less important. This last issue falls outside the parameters of this study, but Chung's argument certainly raises it as worthy of attention. On their own, Borderline Japan: Foreigners and Frontier Controls in the Postwar Era and Immigration and Citizenship in Japan are each important contributions to research on immigration and citizenship politics and policies. Taken together, they provide comprehensive coverage of the historical development of Japan's immigration policies and politics, changes over time, and the current state of affairs, and they also encourage us to anticipate Japan's future. Soft Power in Japan-China Relations: State, Sub-state and Non-state Relations. By Utpal Vyas. Routledge, London, 2011. xiv, 202 pages. $84.95. Reviewed by Marie Söderberg Stockholm School of Economics The complex and tricky relationship between Japan and China is extremely important for the future of Asia. For this reason, research on this topic has increased tremendously in recent years. With the growing Chinese economy and a more outward-oriented China taking an active part in international relations, the power balance has changed, and this is affecting politics. Some researchers have focused on the trilateral relationship among the United States, Japan, and

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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