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Scripted Affects, Branded Selves: Television, Subjectivity, and Capitalism in 1990s Japan , and: Television, Japan, and Globalization (review)

Scripted Affects, Branded Selves: Television, Subjectivity, and Capitalism in 1990s Japan , and:... Japanese business and government elites sustained the distinctive systems of network capitalism. The above two weaknesses are small matters compared with the book's substantial contribution to the study of Japan's political economy. Hatch expects that the pace of change may even accelerate in the wake of the formation of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) government. The road to change seems to be complicated. The New Growth Strategy, which the Kan Naoto cabinet formulated in June 2010, seeks to promote market opening while strengthening state-business linkages for supporting deployment of integrated infrastructure systems. Hatch's research indicates that unless selective relationalism among elites is substantially transformed, Japan's efforts to make its economy return to healthier growth rates will face difficulty. In this sense, Asia's Flying Geese is a recommended reference for policymakers and business managers as well as researchers of the Japanese, East Asian, and comparative political economies. Scripted Affects, Branded Selves: Television, Subjectivity, and Capitalism in 1990s Japan. By Gabriella Lukács. Duke University Press, Durham, 2010. x, 267 pages. $79.95, cloth; $22.95, paper. Television, Japan, and Globalization. Edited by Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, Eva Tsai, and JungBong Choi. Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2010. viii, 289 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Scripted Affects, Branded Selves: Television, Subjectivity, and Capitalism in 1990s Japan , and: Television, Japan, and Globalization (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 38 (1) – Feb 1, 2012

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

Japanese business and government elites sustained the distinctive systems of network capitalism. The above two weaknesses are small matters compared with the book's substantial contribution to the study of Japan's political economy. Hatch expects that the pace of change may even accelerate in the wake of the formation of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) government. The road to change seems to be complicated. The New Growth Strategy, which the Kan Naoto cabinet formulated in June 2010, seeks to promote market opening while strengthening state-business linkages for supporting deployment of integrated infrastructure systems. Hatch's research indicates that unless selective relationalism among elites is substantially transformed, Japan's efforts to make its economy return to healthier growth rates will face difficulty. In this sense, Asia's Flying Geese is a recommended reference for policymakers and business managers as well as researchers of the Japanese, East Asian, and comparative political economies. Scripted Affects, Branded Selves: Television, Subjectivity, and Capitalism in 1990s Japan. By Gabriella Lukács. Duke University Press, Durham, 2010. x, 267 pages. $79.95, cloth; $22.95, paper. Television, Japan, and Globalization. Edited by Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, Eva Tsai, and JungBong Choi. Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2010. viii, 289

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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