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Reforming Japan: The Woman's Christian Temperance Union in the Meiji Period (review)

Reforming Japan: The Woman's Christian Temperance Union in the Meiji Period (review) Review Section male protagonist and by readers who identify with them. The reader would perhaps wish that Murakami could develop this argument more fully and give more examples of how this dynamic plays out in literature. Kawabata's fictional beauties, Kaoru, Komako, Fumiko, and Kikuko, in contrast to their weakness, are also marked by a desire to challenge, but their challenging spirits are carefully concealed behind submissive demeanors (p. 124). Were an egalitarian relationship to be established between the weak women and the strong men in Kawabata's stories, or if love became a means of realizing an egalitarian relationship, then the beauty of purely romantic love in the stories would disappear. Murakami would need to provide fuller arguments that explain how an egalitarian relationship and romantic love are incompatible. Perhaps the reader would find more acceptable the author's point concerning the conflict between egalitarianism and love in Heike monogatari and Hakkenden. Here he explains that when the strong emotions of love and hate disappear, a spirit of egalitarianism emerges. In Kawabata, according to the author, egalitarianism must be suppressed in order to allow romantic love to flourish. The conflict in the minds of the strong between the desire to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Reforming Japan: The Woman's Christian Temperance Union in the Meiji Period (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 38 (1) – Feb 1, 2012

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
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Abstract

Review Section male protagonist and by readers who identify with them. The reader would perhaps wish that Murakami could develop this argument more fully and give more examples of how this dynamic plays out in literature. Kawabata's fictional beauties, Kaoru, Komako, Fumiko, and Kikuko, in contrast to their weakness, are also marked by a desire to challenge, but their challenging spirits are carefully concealed behind submissive demeanors (p. 124). Were an egalitarian relationship to be established between the weak women and the strong men in Kawabata's stories, or if love became a means of realizing an egalitarian relationship, then the beauty of purely romantic love in the stories would disappear. Murakami would need to provide fuller arguments that explain how an egalitarian relationship and romantic love are incompatible. Perhaps the reader would find more acceptable the author's point concerning the conflict between egalitarianism and love in Heike monogatari and Hakkenden. Here he explains that when the strong emotions of love and hate disappear, a spirit of egalitarianism emerges. In Kawabata, according to the author, egalitarianism must be suppressed in order to allow romantic love to flourish. The conflict in the minds of the strong between the desire to

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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