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Asia's Flying Geese: How Regionalization Shapes Japan (review)

Asia's Flying Geese: How Regionalization Shapes Japan (review) hands. One hopes he will now turn to volume 2: ask the focal companies to allow their identities to be disclosed (he has nothing damaging to say about any of them) and offer a detailed account of each of these mergers. How, exactly, was success accomplished? What changes were made? Was a sense of crisis needed? Are there patterns, or how do these five cases differ from each other? A lot can be learned from Olcott's research, and I hope he will continue and bring us more. Asia's Flying Geese: How Regionalization Shapes Japan. By Walter F. Hatch. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 2010. xi, 292 pages. $65.00, cloth; $24.95, paper. Reviewed by Hidetaka Yoshimatsu Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University In 2010, Japan surrendered the position of the world's second-largest economy, which it had held since 1968. Indeed, Japan's long-term economic stagnation, which is shown in its shrinking share of the world's gross domestic product (GDP) and the declining world competitiveness ranking of the International Institute for Management Development (IMD), was directly triggered by the bursting of the bubble economy in the 1990s. However, the decline of economic power including technological capabilities needs to be examined from a comprehensive standpoint http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Asia's Flying Geese: How Regionalization Shapes Japan (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 38 (1) – Feb 1, 2012

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
Publisher site
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Abstract

hands. One hopes he will now turn to volume 2: ask the focal companies to allow their identities to be disclosed (he has nothing damaging to say about any of them) and offer a detailed account of each of these mergers. How, exactly, was success accomplished? What changes were made? Was a sense of crisis needed? Are there patterns, or how do these five cases differ from each other? A lot can be learned from Olcott's research, and I hope he will continue and bring us more. Asia's Flying Geese: How Regionalization Shapes Japan. By Walter F. Hatch. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 2010. xi, 292 pages. $65.00, cloth; $24.95, paper. Reviewed by Hidetaka Yoshimatsu Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University In 2010, Japan surrendered the position of the world's second-largest economy, which it had held since 1968. Indeed, Japan's long-term economic stagnation, which is shown in its shrinking share of the world's gross domestic product (GDP) and the declining world competitiveness ranking of the International Institute for Management Development (IMD), was directly triggered by the bursting of the bubble economy in the 1990s. However, the decline of economic power including technological capabilities needs to be examined from a comprehensive standpoint

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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