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Absolute Erotic, Absolute Grotesque: The Living, Dead, and Undead in Japan's Imperialism, 1895–1945 (review)

Absolute Erotic, Absolute Grotesque: The Living, Dead, and Undead in Japan's Imperialism,... plates, there is no bibliography; and the Japanese names of key organizations and concepts are often omitted, even in the footnotes. Overall, however, this is a fascinating addition to the literature on Japan and its empire in the early years of war with China. It should do much to reinvigorate studies of Japanese society and culture in this crucial period. Absolute Erotic, Absolute Grotesque: The Living, Dead, and Undead in Japan's Imperialism, 1895­1945. By Mark Driscoll. Duke University Press, Durham, 2010. xxi, 361 pages. $89.95, cloth; $24.95, paper. Reviewed by Gerald Figal Vanderbilt University In Thomas Pynchon's novel Gravity's Rainbow, a paragraph muses about the meaning of colonies. It is prompted by the (fictional) "racial suicide" via negative birthrate of those (real) native Herero of German South-West Africa who survived a (real) genocidal extermination program at the hands of their colonial masters from 1904 to 1907: How provoking, to watch one's subject population dwindling like this, year after year. What's a colony without its dusky natives? Where's the fun if they're all going to die off? Just a big hunk of desert, no more maids, no field-hands, no laborers for the construction or the mining--wait, wait a minute http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Japanese Studies Society for Japanese Studies

Absolute Erotic, Absolute Grotesque: The Living, Dead, and Undead in Japan's Imperialism, 1895–1945 (review)

The Journal of Japanese Studies , Volume 38 (1) – Feb 1, 2012

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Publisher
Society for Japanese Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Japanese Studies.
ISSN
1549-4721
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Abstract

plates, there is no bibliography; and the Japanese names of key organizations and concepts are often omitted, even in the footnotes. Overall, however, this is a fascinating addition to the literature on Japan and its empire in the early years of war with China. It should do much to reinvigorate studies of Japanese society and culture in this crucial period. Absolute Erotic, Absolute Grotesque: The Living, Dead, and Undead in Japan's Imperialism, 1895­1945. By Mark Driscoll. Duke University Press, Durham, 2010. xxi, 361 pages. $89.95, cloth; $24.95, paper. Reviewed by Gerald Figal Vanderbilt University In Thomas Pynchon's novel Gravity's Rainbow, a paragraph muses about the meaning of colonies. It is prompted by the (fictional) "racial suicide" via negative birthrate of those (real) native Herero of German South-West Africa who survived a (real) genocidal extermination program at the hands of their colonial masters from 1904 to 1907: How provoking, to watch one's subject population dwindling like this, year after year. What's a colony without its dusky natives? Where's the fun if they're all going to die off? Just a big hunk of desert, no more maids, no field-hands, no laborers for the construction or the mining--wait, wait a minute

Journal

The Journal of Japanese StudiesSociety for Japanese Studies

Published: Feb 1, 2012

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