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Richard Wagner, Fritz Lang, and the Nibelungen (review)

Richard Wagner, Fritz Lang, and the Nibelungen (review) Book Reviews both permitted and limited the radicalism, and if so, what is its significance? Thomas Aquinas was far from a friend to Jews; his writings mark the presence of the new scholastic enemy to the Jews, but also contain thresholds beyond which the thinking can hardly be considered "Catholic." As far as one can establish from the study, figures such as Petrus Venerabilis, Duns Scotus, or Johann Eck (thank goodness) do not play a role in the Catholic discourse of the nineteenth century. Abraham a Santa Clara, however, found favor. Why one and not the other? Was there no model other than the expressive baroque Jewish enemy for the shepherd to follow on the path through the tribulations of modernity? A further examination of traditional adaptations could shed light on such questions as which aspects of the Catholic anti-Judaism were old, which were "modem," and, importantly, which were both simultaneously-and which ones were, in the final analysis, compatible with non-Catholic models ofargumentation. This might illuminate the elements enabling the 20th-century radicalization of hostility toward Jews, which led to genocide. Johannes Heil Zentrum fur Antisemitismusforschung Technische Universitat Berlin Richard Wagner, Fritz Lang, and the Nibelungen, by David J. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Richard Wagner, Fritz Lang, and the Nibelungen (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
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Abstract

Book Reviews both permitted and limited the radicalism, and if so, what is its significance? Thomas Aquinas was far from a friend to Jews; his writings mark the presence of the new scholastic enemy to the Jews, but also contain thresholds beyond which the thinking can hardly be considered "Catholic." As far as one can establish from the study, figures such as Petrus Venerabilis, Duns Scotus, or Johann Eck (thank goodness) do not play a role in the Catholic discourse of the nineteenth century. Abraham a Santa Clara, however, found favor. Why one and not the other? Was there no model other than the expressive baroque Jewish enemy for the shepherd to follow on the path through the tribulations of modernity? A further examination of traditional adaptations could shed light on such questions as which aspects of the Catholic anti-Judaism were old, which were "modem," and, importantly, which were both simultaneously-and which ones were, in the final analysis, compatible with non-Catholic models ofargumentation. This might illuminate the elements enabling the 20th-century radicalization of hostility toward Jews, which led to genocide. Johannes Heil Zentrum fur Antisemitismusforschung Technische Universitat Berlin Richard Wagner, Fritz Lang, and the Nibelungen, by David J.

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 2000

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