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Deborah, Golda, and Me: Being Female and Jewish in America (review)

Deborah, Golda, and Me: Being Female and Jewish in America (review) Vol. 10, No. 4 SUl'nl'ner 1992 Deborah, Golda, and Me: Being Female and Jewish in America, by Letty Cottin Pogrebin. New York: Crown Publishers, 1991. 396 pp. $22.00. Pogrebin's latest book, a personal response to being a Jewish female in contemporary America, is a passionate work, which accounts for its strengths as well as its weaknesses. The first half of the book chronicles Pogrebin's experiences as a young Jew in an observant household which had close ties with Israel. She covers her sense of exclusion from the heart of Jewish life based on gender and her subsequent involvement with the emerging Women's Movement, where she was able to lind a sense of meaning and self-worth. In large measure this is a coming-of-age story, and few Jewish women of "a certain age" would not find much that was familiar. What emerges is the degree to which feminism became an allencompassing commitment for those women who entered adulthood in the 1960s, a commitment which left little room for the spiritual side of one's life. But it is the feminism which eventually leads Pogrebin back to Judaism, albeit from a different perspective. And it is the need to integrate what she http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Deborah, Golda, and Me: Being Female and Jewish in America (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

Vol. 10, No. 4 SUl'nl'ner 1992 Deborah, Golda, and Me: Being Female and Jewish in America, by Letty Cottin Pogrebin. New York: Crown Publishers, 1991. 396 pp. $22.00. Pogrebin's latest book, a personal response to being a Jewish female in contemporary America, is a passionate work, which accounts for its strengths as well as its weaknesses. The first half of the book chronicles Pogrebin's experiences as a young Jew in an observant household which had close ties with Israel. She covers her sense of exclusion from the heart of Jewish life based on gender and her subsequent involvement with the emerging Women's Movement, where she was able to lind a sense of meaning and self-worth. In large measure this is a coming-of-age story, and few Jewish women of "a certain age" would not find much that was familiar. What emerges is the degree to which feminism became an allencompassing commitment for those women who entered adulthood in the 1960s, a commitment which left little room for the spiritual side of one's life. But it is the feminism which eventually leads Pogrebin back to Judaism, albeit from a different perspective. And it is the need to integrate what she

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1992

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