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The Other Loyalists: Ordinary People, Royalism, and the Revolution in the Middle Colonies, 1763–1787 (review)

The Other Loyalists: Ordinary People, Royalism, and the Revolution in the Middle Colonies,... book reviews the ceremonies at cultural face-value, the author shows the theatrical nature of the displays and interprets the intentions of the actors, both Indian and white. As in the case of the Treaty at Greenville of 1795, the United States paternal political relationship with Northwestern Indians "was to be a provider and mediator, not a punisher of wrongdoers" (176). Equally as important, Nichols recognizes the mutual misunderstandings stemming from such conferences and the bloody conflicts that ensued. Rather than using indigenous people as passive critiques of western society, this book incorporates Native Americans as integral and dynamic players without demonizing or generalizing non-Indians. There is something for all readers interested in early republic and Native American history. Nichols' discussions are broad enough to explain the development of the early American republic for an introductory course and detailed enough to produce graduate level discussions. The only limitation was the lack of useful maps. The one general map showed where treaty conferences were throughout the time period but maps detailing the effects of treaties, especially land cessations, would be a very useful addition, especially for non-specialists. The narrative binds together the patch-work quilt of events and characters on the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies Penn State University Press

The Other Loyalists: Ordinary People, Royalism, and the Revolution in the Middle Colonies, 1763–1787 (review)

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
2153-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

book reviews the ceremonies at cultural face-value, the author shows the theatrical nature of the displays and interprets the intentions of the actors, both Indian and white. As in the case of the Treaty at Greenville of 1795, the United States paternal political relationship with Northwestern Indians "was to be a provider and mediator, not a punisher of wrongdoers" (176). Equally as important, Nichols recognizes the mutual misunderstandings stemming from such conferences and the bloody conflicts that ensued. Rather than using indigenous people as passive critiques of western society, this book incorporates Native Americans as integral and dynamic players without demonizing or generalizing non-Indians. There is something for all readers interested in early republic and Native American history. Nichols' discussions are broad enough to explain the development of the early American republic for an introductory course and detailed enough to produce graduate level discussions. The only limitation was the lack of useful maps. The one general map showed where treaty conferences were throughout the time period but maps detailing the effects of treaties, especially land cessations, would be a very useful addition, especially for non-specialists. The narrative binds together the patch-work quilt of events and characters on the

Journal

Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jul 16, 2010

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