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The "New Property" Theory of Welfare Rights: Promises and Pitfalls

The "New Property" Theory of Welfare Rights: Promises and Pitfalls A PEGS Journal VOL. 13 NO. 2 THE GOOD SOCIETY Committee on the Political Economy of the Good Society "The art of governing well has to be learned."-- Walter Lippmann Elizabeth Bussiere While always central to the U.S. liberal lexicon, the idea of security has loomed very large in political discourse since 9-11. The destruction of national landmarks, coupled with a faltering economy, has aroused a foreboding sense of insecurity even among the solidly middle class. Yet it is the poor who are the most vulnerable. A recent study should give pause to those who advocate stiffening the work rules under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Increased numbers of children are living in households without either parent, a disconcerting development given that TANF was touted as a means of strengthening families. The "stresses of the new welfare world -- loss of benefits, low-wage jobs at irregular hours and pressure from a new partner needed to pay the rent" contribute to family break-up.1 Ironically, some TANF recipients' plights have deteriorated because of their own dogged efforts to be conscientious employees. In August 2002 a New York City mother was charged with neglect and lost custody of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

The "New Property" Theory of Welfare Rights: Promises and Pitfalls

The Good Society , Volume 13 (2) – Jun 1, 2004

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

A PEGS Journal VOL. 13 NO. 2 THE GOOD SOCIETY Committee on the Political Economy of the Good Society "The art of governing well has to be learned."-- Walter Lippmann Elizabeth Bussiere While always central to the U.S. liberal lexicon, the idea of security has loomed very large in political discourse since 9-11. The destruction of national landmarks, coupled with a faltering economy, has aroused a foreboding sense of insecurity even among the solidly middle class. Yet it is the poor who are the most vulnerable. A recent study should give pause to those who advocate stiffening the work rules under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Increased numbers of children are living in households without either parent, a disconcerting development given that TANF was touted as a means of strengthening families. The "stresses of the new welfare world -- loss of benefits, low-wage jobs at irregular hours and pressure from a new partner needed to pay the rent" contribute to family break-up.1 Ironically, some TANF recipients' plights have deteriorated because of their own dogged efforts to be conscientious employees. In August 2002 a New York City mother was charged with neglect and lost custody of

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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