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The Comparative Journeys: Essays on Literature and Religion East and West (review)

The Comparative Journeys: Essays on Literature and Religion East and West (review) BOOK REVIEWS of Much Ado About Nothing (1957), where Soviet Maoism complicates matters greatly. The Bard's home seemed closer to Moscow than Stratford in that time, in that place. Huang deftly untangles these various legacies, surprising meanings, and hidden contexts while eschewing easy moralism. (One is reminded of the fact, passions aside, that England's closest competitor as a colonial power was always ... Turkey.) And so China and Taiwan have always taken what was needed from Shakespeare, even if it was only a title, often to transmit their own cultural myths, none richer than those of the Chinese opera, the subject of chapter 6. A tradition of painted-face performances naturally welcomed Othello, especially after the Soviet film by Sergei Yutkevitch was shown (it won the best director award at Cannes in 1956). Not Shakespeare. Not exactly China. It's all part of what Alex Huang calls "Chinese Shakespeares," the mutual interplay between what by now has to go in scare quotes: "Shakespeare" and "China." This theoretically astute book examines Chinese Shakespeares from a wider array of genres and localities associated with imaginaries of China than have previous studies. It situates Chinese Shakespeares within the critical discourse of global Shakespeares, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

The Comparative Journeys: Essays on Literature and Religion East and West (review)

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 47 (3) – Oct 16, 2010

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
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Copyright © Penn State University Press
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1528-4212
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS of Much Ado About Nothing (1957), where Soviet Maoism complicates matters greatly. The Bard's home seemed closer to Moscow than Stratford in that time, in that place. Huang deftly untangles these various legacies, surprising meanings, and hidden contexts while eschewing easy moralism. (One is reminded of the fact, passions aside, that England's closest competitor as a colonial power was always ... Turkey.) And so China and Taiwan have always taken what was needed from Shakespeare, even if it was only a title, often to transmit their own cultural myths, none richer than those of the Chinese opera, the subject of chapter 6. A tradition of painted-face performances naturally welcomed Othello, especially after the Soviet film by Sergei Yutkevitch was shown (it won the best director award at Cannes in 1956). Not Shakespeare. Not exactly China. It's all part of what Alex Huang calls "Chinese Shakespeares," the mutual interplay between what by now has to go in scare quotes: "Shakespeare" and "China." This theoretically astute book examines Chinese Shakespeares from a wider array of genres and localities associated with imaginaries of China than have previous studies. It situates Chinese Shakespeares within the critical discourse of global Shakespeares,

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Oct 16, 2010

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