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Seeds of a Different Eden: Chinese Garden Ideas and a New English Aesthetic Ideal (review)

Seeds of a Different Eden: Chinese Garden Ideas and a New English Aesthetic Ideal (review) BOOK REVIEWS the book, I found myself pondering the contemporary implications of Adam Smith's reliance in his hypothesis on the invisibility of Chinese sufferers in the wake of live media coverage of events in China, from Tiananmen Square in June 1989 to the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008. Has the structure of perception been transformed by this coverage, and if so, how? The trope of the pained Chinese has proven to be fascinatingly resilient through the times. In a key scene in the film Flying Tigers (1942), Woody ( John Carroll) explains to Jim ( John Wayne) his newly discovered motivation for flying in a bomber squadron stationed in China: "A whole lot of us don't grow up. We stay kids. The most important thing to a kid is the street he lives on. It's his life, it's his whole world. That was me when I first joined up with you. Hong Kong, Shanghai, Chungking--they didn't mean anything to me, just a lot of names in a geography book! Not towns where millions of people were being maimed and killed by bombs! If you called them Texas, Maine, or Michigan--that would have been different. They were my street. That's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Seeds of a Different Eden: Chinese Garden Ideas and a New English Aesthetic Ideal (review)

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 47 (3) – Oct 16, 2010

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Penn State University Press
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Copyright © Penn State University Press
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1528-4212
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS the book, I found myself pondering the contemporary implications of Adam Smith's reliance in his hypothesis on the invisibility of Chinese sufferers in the wake of live media coverage of events in China, from Tiananmen Square in June 1989 to the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008. Has the structure of perception been transformed by this coverage, and if so, how? The trope of the pained Chinese has proven to be fascinatingly resilient through the times. In a key scene in the film Flying Tigers (1942), Woody ( John Carroll) explains to Jim ( John Wayne) his newly discovered motivation for flying in a bomber squadron stationed in China: "A whole lot of us don't grow up. We stay kids. The most important thing to a kid is the street he lives on. It's his life, it's his whole world. That was me when I first joined up with you. Hong Kong, Shanghai, Chungking--they didn't mean anything to me, just a lot of names in a geography book! Not towns where millions of people were being maimed and killed by bombs! If you called them Texas, Maine, or Michigan--that would have been different. They were my street. That's

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Oct 16, 2010

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