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Professional Expertise in a Deliberative Democracy

Professional Expertise in a Deliberative Democracy Professional Expertise in a Deliberative Democracy: Facilitating Participatory Inquiry Frank Fischer logical society. This new complexity was seen as a serious threat Measured in terms of citizen participation, American democto the future of American democracy, especially when combined racy leaves much to be desired. (Putnam 2000; Skocpol 2003). with the kinds of demagoguery witnessed in Western societies Participation levels are low and a large percentage of citizens during and after WWII. Such societies, increasingly defined as report that they have little or no contact with their political leadmass societies governed by elites, offered less and less political ers; many say they are turned off by the process. As citizen parspace for the individual citizen in the policy process. Dewey, like ticipation is the normative cornerstone of a democratic system, Lippmann, asked how the public could deal with the complexithis is indeed cause for concern. ties of a highly differentiated, technologically-driven society. There is no shortage of explanations for this phenomenon, How could citizens participate in policy decision-making so obviranging from barriers to voter registration and political alienously dependent on the knowledge of experts? Where Lippmann ation to problems of complexity and citizen incompetence. Zolo saw little hope for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Professional Expertise in a Deliberative Democracy

The Good Society , Volume 13 (1)

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

Professional Expertise in a Deliberative Democracy: Facilitating Participatory Inquiry Frank Fischer logical society. This new complexity was seen as a serious threat Measured in terms of citizen participation, American democto the future of American democracy, especially when combined racy leaves much to be desired. (Putnam 2000; Skocpol 2003). with the kinds of demagoguery witnessed in Western societies Participation levels are low and a large percentage of citizens during and after WWII. Such societies, increasingly defined as report that they have little or no contact with their political leadmass societies governed by elites, offered less and less political ers; many say they are turned off by the process. As citizen parspace for the individual citizen in the policy process. Dewey, like ticipation is the normative cornerstone of a democratic system, Lippmann, asked how the public could deal with the complexithis is indeed cause for concern. ties of a highly differentiated, technologically-driven society. There is no shortage of explanations for this phenomenon, How could citizens participate in policy decision-making so obviranging from barriers to voter registration and political alienously dependent on the knowledge of experts? Where Lippmann ation to problems of complexity and citizen incompetence. Zolo saw little hope for

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

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