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On Natural Right and Other Un-written Guides to Political Well-being

On Natural Right and Other Un-written Guides to Political Well-being Charles E. Butterworth reflected deeply on nature and on how it does or can shape human conduct. Precisely because the modern rejection of Aristotle and The sad saga of David Bruce-Brenda Reimer's struggle with his reasoning does not constitute a refutation, it is reasonable to ask medical clumsiness and parental willfulness provides powerful what we might learn from him about such fundamental matters. testimony that human attempts to force nature to their own The three actions Aristotle deems to admit of no mean, that is, whims can have tragic consequences.1 It does not, however, shed to be wrong no matter how they are done--adultery, stealing, any light on natural law nor prove it to be founded on human and murder--come immediately to mind, even though there may nature. Nor, claims from the bench notwithstanding, is there any be some disagreement about the passions he identifies as admitevidence that natural law actually guides judicial practice in the ting of no mean, namely, Schadenfreude, shamelessness, and U.S. To revere Saint Thomas is one thing. To accept his proenvy.4 So, too, though he mentions it in a less declaratory mannouncements about natural law and its ner, is the case with injustice: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

On Natural Right and Other Un-written Guides to Political Well-being

The Good Society , Volume 15 (2) – May 21, 2006

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

Charles E. Butterworth reflected deeply on nature and on how it does or can shape human conduct. Precisely because the modern rejection of Aristotle and The sad saga of David Bruce-Brenda Reimer's struggle with his reasoning does not constitute a refutation, it is reasonable to ask medical clumsiness and parental willfulness provides powerful what we might learn from him about such fundamental matters. testimony that human attempts to force nature to their own The three actions Aristotle deems to admit of no mean, that is, whims can have tragic consequences.1 It does not, however, shed to be wrong no matter how they are done--adultery, stealing, any light on natural law nor prove it to be founded on human and murder--come immediately to mind, even though there may nature. Nor, claims from the bench notwithstanding, is there any be some disagreement about the passions he identifies as admitevidence that natural law actually guides judicial practice in the ting of no mean, namely, Schadenfreude, shamelessness, and U.S. To revere Saint Thomas is one thing. To accept his proenvy.4 So, too, though he mentions it in a less declaratory mannouncements about natural law and its ner, is the case with injustice:

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: May 21, 2006

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