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Notes on the Old Political Science for the Present Age

Notes on the Old Political Science for the Present Age A PEGS Journal VOL. 13 NO. 3 THE GOOD SOCIETY Committee on the Political Economy of the Good Society "The art of governing well has to be learned." -- Walter Lippmann Stephen L. Elkin In the effort to understand present day democracy, contemporary political science pays little attention to the old political science, that is, to the tradition of political science that originated with Plato and Aristotle. The arguments that these two thinkers initiated were taken up by the moderns, theorists such as Rousseau and Burke, and by their successors among whom may be counted Hannah Arendt and Leo Strauss. If any attention is paid by contemporary political science, it usually takes the form of saying that there is something to learn from these theorists ­ a few footnotes scattered through the text is meant to indicate that this is so ­ and then the discussion moves on happily, as if what the footnotes point to isn't really all that important. The little serious attention that is paid takes its bearings from people writing as philosophers working in philosophy departments, John Rawls being the obvious example. By and large, these philosophers take their bearings from Kant and Bentham, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Notes on the Old Political Science for the Present Age

The Good Society , Volume 13 (3) – Nov 4, 2004

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

A PEGS Journal VOL. 13 NO. 3 THE GOOD SOCIETY Committee on the Political Economy of the Good Society "The art of governing well has to be learned." -- Walter Lippmann Stephen L. Elkin In the effort to understand present day democracy, contemporary political science pays little attention to the old political science, that is, to the tradition of political science that originated with Plato and Aristotle. The arguments that these two thinkers initiated were taken up by the moderns, theorists such as Rousseau and Burke, and by their successors among whom may be counted Hannah Arendt and Leo Strauss. If any attention is paid by contemporary political science, it usually takes the form of saying that there is something to learn from these theorists ­ a few footnotes scattered through the text is meant to indicate that this is so ­ and then the discussion moves on happily, as if what the footnotes point to isn't really all that important. The little serious attention that is paid takes its bearings from people writing as philosophers working in philosophy departments, John Rawls being the obvious example. By and large, these philosophers take their bearings from Kant and Bentham,

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 4, 2004

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