Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Naturalizing Heidegger: His Confrontation with Nietzsche, His Contributions to Environmental Philosophy by David E. Storey (review)

Naturalizing Heidegger: His Confrontation with Nietzsche, His Contributions to Environmental... 144 | J o u R n A l o f n i e t z s c h e s t u d i e s Panaïoti demonstrates that this cultivation of compassion does not involve the suffering of the weak that Nietzsche opposes. However, this interpretation contrasts with Panaïoti's interpretation of nirva as the basis of Ngrjuna's Buddhism. Specifically, Panaïoti uses the tenets of a different Buddhist school, the Theravda one, to demonstrate that the compassion necessary to the attainment of nirva affirmed by the Ngrjuna school does not involve suffering. The problem is that the Theravda school envisions nirva as the cessation of sasra, while the Ngrjuna school conceives it as an enlightened way of being in sasra. Panaïoti concludes by proposing a fascinating Buddho-Nietzschean ethics of great health in response to modern nihilism. He describes the healthy type as a self-determining type who is aware of the becoming of reality and engages with it through irony, that is, by creating a self and things in the full knowledge that they are mere creations because the world lacks substance. Above all, the healthy type who has attained great health has the aim of "nudging people http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Naturalizing Heidegger: His Confrontation with Nietzsche, His Contributions to Environmental Philosophy by David E. Storey (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 48 (1) – Mar 14, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/naturalizing-heidegger-his-confrontation-with-nietzsche-his-v9GNjw4fnq
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

144 | J o u R n A l o f n i e t z s c h e s t u d i e s Panaïoti demonstrates that this cultivation of compassion does not involve the suffering of the weak that Nietzsche opposes. However, this interpretation contrasts with Panaïoti's interpretation of nirva as the basis of Ngrjuna's Buddhism. Specifically, Panaïoti uses the tenets of a different Buddhist school, the Theravda one, to demonstrate that the compassion necessary to the attainment of nirva affirmed by the Ngrjuna school does not involve suffering. The problem is that the Theravda school envisions nirva as the cessation of sasra, while the Ngrjuna school conceives it as an enlightened way of being in sasra. Panaïoti concludes by proposing a fascinating Buddho-Nietzschean ethics of great health in response to modern nihilism. He describes the healthy type as a self-determining type who is aware of the becoming of reality and engages with it through irony, that is, by creating a self and things in the full knowledge that they are mere creations because the world lacks substance. Above all, the healthy type who has attained great health has the aim of "nudging people

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 14, 2017

There are no references for this article.