Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Mapping World Literature: International Canonization and Transnational Literatures (review)

Mapping World Literature: International Canonization and Transnational Literatures (review) COMPARATIVE LITERATURE STUDIES of their literary inheritance and the Christian hedonism of their religious tradition as involuntary absorption or unconscious internalization of foreign influence. In the same light, we can appreciate the innocence of Xu Guangqi, one of the three Christian disciples converted by Ricci, who reported in his 1616 memorial to the Chinese emperor about over thirty ideal countries in the West that were modeled after the Chinese utopia [grand union]. As an East-West comparative study, the book's research has perhaps relied too heavily on English data in Western libraries. The reader's understanding of Chinese gardening ideas is supplied by Western perceptions. It might be have been more helpful for the reader if the author had included a chapter that introduced Chinese horticulture and related ideas during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries against the background of Chinese horticulture history from the Chinese perspective. Liu might have also considered mentioning Taoism in his discussion of Chinese garden ideas and the philosophy of (which is better translated as "oneness between man and nature") as well as in the last chapter. It would certainly have been helpful to introduce Mencius and Xun Zi into the discussions of human nature in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Mapping World Literature: International Canonization and Transnational Literatures (review)

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 47 (3) – Oct 16, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/mapping-world-literature-international-canonization-and-transnational-DLV3dC0zcK
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
1528-4212
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE STUDIES of their literary inheritance and the Christian hedonism of their religious tradition as involuntary absorption or unconscious internalization of foreign influence. In the same light, we can appreciate the innocence of Xu Guangqi, one of the three Christian disciples converted by Ricci, who reported in his 1616 memorial to the Chinese emperor about over thirty ideal countries in the West that were modeled after the Chinese utopia [grand union]. As an East-West comparative study, the book's research has perhaps relied too heavily on English data in Western libraries. The reader's understanding of Chinese gardening ideas is supplied by Western perceptions. It might be have been more helpful for the reader if the author had included a chapter that introduced Chinese horticulture and related ideas during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries against the background of Chinese horticulture history from the Chinese perspective. Liu might have also considered mentioning Taoism in his discussion of Chinese garden ideas and the philosophy of (which is better translated as "oneness between man and nature") as well as in the last chapter. It would certainly have been helpful to introduce Mencius and Xun Zi into the discussions of human nature in

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Oct 16, 2010

There are no references for this article.