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García Márquez and Ovid: Magical and Monstrous Realities by Lorna Robinson (review)

García Márquez and Ovid: Magical and Monstrous Realities by Lorna Robinson (review) BOOK REVIEWS García Márquez and Ovid: Magical and Monstrous Realities. By Lorna Robinson. Woodbridge: Tamesis, 2013. 188 pp. $99. Reviewed by Jerónimo Arellano, Brandeis University In her book García Márquez and Ovid: Magical and Monstrous Realities, Lorna Robinson pursues a daring comparative reading of two texts that, as the author herself recognizes from the outset, "could not seem further apart" (1): Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, a novel emblematic of the literature of the Latin American boom of the 1960s; and Ovid's Metamorphoses, a narrative poem composed during the reign of emperor Augustus in ancient Rome. Trained as a classicist but demonstrating an ample knowledge of modern Latin American literature and criticism, Robinson emerges as an author unusually qualified for this task. Robinson warns that her reading does not intend to focus on One Hundred Years of Solitude--rather, she declares, her intention is to take García Márquez's novel--and, more importantly, the notion of "magical realism" to which it is predominantly associated--as "a prism through which to illuminate" Ovid's Metamorphoses (1). The promise of this book, then, is to produce an innovative reading of Ovid's poem through the lens of a concept that may appear out http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

García Márquez and Ovid: Magical and Monstrous Realities by Lorna Robinson (review)

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 53 (1) – Mar 23, 2016

García Márquez and Ovid: Magical and Monstrous Realities by Lorna Robinson (review)


BOOK REVIEWS García Márquez and Ovid: Magical and Monstrous Realities. By Lorna Robinson. Woodbridge: Tamesis, 2013. 188 pp. $99. Reviewed by Jerónimo Arellano, Brandeis University In her book García Márquez and Ovid: Magical and Monstrous Realities, Lorna Robinson pursues a daring comparative reading of two texts that, as the author herself recognizes from the outset, "could not seem further apart" (1): Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, a novel emblematic of the literature of the Latin American boom of the 1960s; and Ovid's Metamorphoses, a narrative poem composed during the reign of emperor Augustus in ancient Rome. Trained as a classicist but demonstrating an ample knowledge of modern Latin American literature and criticism, Robinson emerges as an author unusually qualified for this task. Robinson warns that her reading does not intend to focus on One Hundred Years of Solitude--rather, she declares, her intention is to take García Márquez's novel--and, more importantly, the notion of "magical realism" to which it is predominantly associated--as "a prism through which to illuminate" Ovid's Metamorphoses (1). The promise of this book, then, is to produce an innovative reading of Ovid's poem through the lens of a concept that may appear out of place in a study of a classical text. Such a project, Robinson notes, finds its bearings in recent scholarship that rethinks classical literature in conversation with modern theoretical concepts and methodologies. In the context of Robinson's study, the risk of setting up this particular dialogue is to further diffuse the notion of magical realism, which has been disparaged almost since its inception because of its theoretical vacuity and over-generalized application. García Márquez and Ovid is divided into four chapters. The first explores magical realism as a range...
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Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS García Márquez and Ovid: Magical and Monstrous Realities. By Lorna Robinson. Woodbridge: Tamesis, 2013. 188 pp. $99. Reviewed by Jerónimo Arellano, Brandeis University In her book García Márquez and Ovid: Magical and Monstrous Realities, Lorna Robinson pursues a daring comparative reading of two texts that, as the author herself recognizes from the outset, "could not seem further apart" (1): Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, a novel emblematic of the literature of the Latin American boom of the 1960s; and Ovid's Metamorphoses, a narrative poem composed during the reign of emperor Augustus in ancient Rome. Trained as a classicist but demonstrating an ample knowledge of modern Latin American literature and criticism, Robinson emerges as an author unusually qualified for this task. Robinson warns that her reading does not intend to focus on One Hundred Years of Solitude--rather, she declares, her intention is to take García Márquez's novel--and, more importantly, the notion of "magical realism" to which it is predominantly associated--as "a prism through which to illuminate" Ovid's Metamorphoses (1). The promise of this book, then, is to produce an innovative reading of Ovid's poem through the lens of a concept that may appear out

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 23, 2016

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