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From Machiavellian Foundings to Republican Law

From Machiavellian Foundings to Republican Law Jacqueline R. Hunsicker As the stated goal of Niccolò Machiavelli's Discourses on so much about what contemporary political scientists think of as Livy1 is to re-incline modern men towards imitation of the exam"public opinion" as about the effects of opinion on men generples found in ancient histories, prudence commands that ally, a study which necessarily examines those who inculcate Machiavelli write for a wide audience--for all those who, in his opinion in citizens (the lawgivers) and the various uses and ends time or in subsequent ones, can learn of that seemingly ever-shifting opinion from his commentary on and presenta(the creation and maintenance of politLike Machiavelli himself, tion of Roman history. Like ical regimes). Given this, it seems that Machiavellian man is envious and Machiavelli himself, Machiavellian when Machiavelli criticizes opinion ambitious by nature, but he can be man is envious and ambitious by held by people of his day, it is not opinled to acknowledge the importance nature, but he can be led to acknowlion qua opinion that he rejects, but of prudence if he sees that it can edge the importance of prudence, parrather, dangerous or unprofitable opinserve his driving ambition. ticularly political prudence if he sees http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

From Machiavellian Foundings to Republican Law

The Good Society , Volume 15 (2) – May 21, 2006

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1538-9731
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Abstract

Jacqueline R. Hunsicker As the stated goal of Niccolò Machiavelli's Discourses on so much about what contemporary political scientists think of as Livy1 is to re-incline modern men towards imitation of the exam"public opinion" as about the effects of opinion on men generples found in ancient histories, prudence commands that ally, a study which necessarily examines those who inculcate Machiavelli write for a wide audience--for all those who, in his opinion in citizens (the lawgivers) and the various uses and ends time or in subsequent ones, can learn of that seemingly ever-shifting opinion from his commentary on and presenta(the creation and maintenance of politLike Machiavelli himself, tion of Roman history. Like ical regimes). Given this, it seems that Machiavellian man is envious and Machiavelli himself, Machiavellian when Machiavelli criticizes opinion ambitious by nature, but he can be man is envious and ambitious by held by people of his day, it is not opinled to acknowledge the importance nature, but he can be led to acknowlion qua opinion that he rejects, but of prudence if he sees that it can edge the importance of prudence, parrather, dangerous or unprofitable opinserve his driving ambition. ticularly political prudence if he sees

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: May 21, 2006

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