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Faith-Based Initiatives: A Civil Society Approach

Faith-Based Initiatives: A Civil Society Approach A PEGS Journal VOL. 12 NO. 1 "The art of governing well has to be learned."--Walter Lippmann Committee on the Political Economy of Essays on Civil Society Jeffrey C. Issac On January 29, 2001, President George W. Bush signed two Executive Orders. The first created a White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. The second established centers in five federal departments--Justice, Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services, Labor, and Education--charged with the responsibility of clearing away what Bush called "bureaucratic barriers" that hinder the involvement of private faith-based organizations in the work of these agencies. The purpose of these orders was, in his words, "to invigorate the spirit of involvement and citizenship" by promoting public solutions that "look first to faith-based programs and community groups."1 In taking these actions, Bush took the first step in codifying the philosophy of "compassionate conservatism" that he had enunciated throughout his Presidential campaign, and that he also sought to apply in his tenure as Governor of Texas. While these steps involved no new legislation--and while the Bush administration has itself hedged about when and if it might seek new legislation to promote these objectives--conservative members of Congress wasted no http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Faith-Based Initiatives: A Civil Society Approach

The Good Society , Volume 12 (1) – Dec 2, 2003

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

A PEGS Journal VOL. 12 NO. 1 "The art of governing well has to be learned."--Walter Lippmann Committee on the Political Economy of Essays on Civil Society Jeffrey C. Issac On January 29, 2001, President George W. Bush signed two Executive Orders. The first created a White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. The second established centers in five federal departments--Justice, Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services, Labor, and Education--charged with the responsibility of clearing away what Bush called "bureaucratic barriers" that hinder the involvement of private faith-based organizations in the work of these agencies. The purpose of these orders was, in his words, "to invigorate the spirit of involvement and citizenship" by promoting public solutions that "look first to faith-based programs and community groups."1 In taking these actions, Bush took the first step in codifying the philosophy of "compassionate conservatism" that he had enunciated throughout his Presidential campaign, and that he also sought to apply in his tenure as Governor of Texas. While these steps involved no new legislation--and while the Bush administration has itself hedged about when and if it might seek new legislation to promote these objectives--conservative members of Congress wasted no

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Dec 2, 2003

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