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European Citizenship Introduction

European Citizenship Introduction SYMPOSIUM Symposium: Democracy in the Electronic Era Sebastien Gagnon-Messier It was more than ten years ago, in February 1992, that the that revisions be made to the citizenship clause of the Maastricht heads of state of the (then) twelve members of the European Treaty.1 In spite of its limited scope, European citizenship did represent a significant concession on the part of member states, Community/European Union signed the Treaty of Maastricht. According to the European Commission, the introduction of the and opened up additional avenues of participation for citizens and non-citizens alike at the European level. In their conclusion, supra-national European citizenship made "the link between the citizens in the Member States and the European Union [ . . . ] they ask whether citizens will use these additional avenues to more direct" (2002.) Although such a citizenship was unprecemobilize and make claims on the state. That question is in turn taken up by Guild in her piece on the Carpenter decision of the dented, writers had already begun discussing the apparent eroEuropean Court of Justice. sion of national citizenship and the blurring of the line between The Carpenter case presented an interesting challenge to the rights of citizens http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

European Citizenship Introduction

The Good Society , Volume 12 (1) – Dec 2, 2003

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

SYMPOSIUM Symposium: Democracy in the Electronic Era Sebastien Gagnon-Messier It was more than ten years ago, in February 1992, that the that revisions be made to the citizenship clause of the Maastricht heads of state of the (then) twelve members of the European Treaty.1 In spite of its limited scope, European citizenship did represent a significant concession on the part of member states, Community/European Union signed the Treaty of Maastricht. According to the European Commission, the introduction of the and opened up additional avenues of participation for citizens and non-citizens alike at the European level. In their conclusion, supra-national European citizenship made "the link between the citizens in the Member States and the European Union [ . . . ] they ask whether citizens will use these additional avenues to more direct" (2002.) Although such a citizenship was unprecemobilize and make claims on the state. That question is in turn taken up by Guild in her piece on the Carpenter decision of the dented, writers had already begun discussing the apparent eroEuropean Court of Justice. sion of national citizenship and the blurring of the line between The Carpenter case presented an interesting challenge to the rights of citizens

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Dec 2, 2003

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