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Democratic Citizenship in Today's Europe

Democratic Citizenship in Today's Europe Bernard P. Dauenhauer The complex phenomenon of globalization, with its economic, less substantial than those facing transnational polities such as military, environmental, and cultural implications, has clearly the EU. Like the EU, these states must (1) deal with self-seekeroded the capacity of individual states to effectively govern their ing by some citizens who have no regard for others, (2) conduct people in a number of important parts of ordinary life. But it debates and make decisions about distributive justice despite the also holds promise of improving the quality of life for many peolack of generally agreed upon convictions about the goods to be ple in ways that individual states cannot be expected to do. As allotted, and (3) cope with the linguistic and cultural diversity a consequence, globalization has motivated a search for alteras well as the geographical expanses over which their citizens native forms of political organizations than those that characare spread.1 He concludes: "The planners of transnational democracy can learn from the institutional mechanisms through which terize traditional states. their predecessors at the national level succeeded in overcomThe European Union can rightly be regarded as a kind of ing these obstacles in significant measure."2 live experiment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Democratic Citizenship in Today's Europe

The Good Society , Volume 12 (1) – Dec 2, 2003

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

Bernard P. Dauenhauer The complex phenomenon of globalization, with its economic, less substantial than those facing transnational polities such as military, environmental, and cultural implications, has clearly the EU. Like the EU, these states must (1) deal with self-seekeroded the capacity of individual states to effectively govern their ing by some citizens who have no regard for others, (2) conduct people in a number of important parts of ordinary life. But it debates and make decisions about distributive justice despite the also holds promise of improving the quality of life for many peolack of generally agreed upon convictions about the goods to be ple in ways that individual states cannot be expected to do. As allotted, and (3) cope with the linguistic and cultural diversity a consequence, globalization has motivated a search for alteras well as the geographical expanses over which their citizens native forms of political organizations than those that characare spread.1 He concludes: "The planners of transnational democracy can learn from the institutional mechanisms through which terize traditional states. their predecessors at the national level succeeded in overcomThe European Union can rightly be regarded as a kind of ing these obstacles in significant measure."2 live experiment

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Dec 2, 2003

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