Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Cruelty, Liberalism, and Liberal Education

Cruelty, Liberalism, and Liberal Education Ann Hartle Evil has many forms. All of the vices, for example, would longer accepted by many people. Therefore, the "shared ideal count as evil: drunkenness and wrath, although very different sanctified by the church" no longer has any authority and people from each other, are both vices and therefore both evil. Crimes, "are freer than ever before to choose what they believe and how too, are all evil insofar as they harm others, whether to a greater they live their lives" (109). or lesser degree. Yet we do rank vices and crimes, and we tend to The freedom that is characteristic of modern life leads, in many use the term `evil' to refer to vices, crimes, and immoral actions cases, to an absence of direction in one's life and to an inability to that are of a certain kind, that have a certain quality. John Kekes distinguish between important and unimportant in one's choices. has identified this particular quality and given a profoundly per"All evaluations appear arbitrary because the ground on which ceptive account of it in his chapter on "Disenchantment with they were based has disappeared" (110). Kekes describes the disOrdinary Life." He concludes that chapter http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Cruelty, Liberalism, and Liberal Education

The Good Society , Volume 15 (2) – May 21, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/cruelty-liberalism-and-liberal-education-NhYLaGNDIF
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ann Hartle Evil has many forms. All of the vices, for example, would longer accepted by many people. Therefore, the "shared ideal count as evil: drunkenness and wrath, although very different sanctified by the church" no longer has any authority and people from each other, are both vices and therefore both evil. Crimes, "are freer than ever before to choose what they believe and how too, are all evil insofar as they harm others, whether to a greater they live their lives" (109). or lesser degree. Yet we do rank vices and crimes, and we tend to The freedom that is characteristic of modern life leads, in many use the term `evil' to refer to vices, crimes, and immoral actions cases, to an absence of direction in one's life and to an inability to that are of a certain kind, that have a certain quality. John Kekes distinguish between important and unimportant in one's choices. has identified this particular quality and given a profoundly per"All evaluations appear arbitrary because the ground on which ceptive account of it in his chapter on "Disenchantment with they were based has disappeared" (110). Kekes describes the disOrdinary Life." He concludes that chapter

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: May 21, 2006

There are no references for this article.