Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Cosmopolitan Publics: Anglophone Print Culture in Semi-Colonial Shanghai (review)

Cosmopolitan Publics: Anglophone Print Culture in Semi-Colonial Shanghai (review) book reviews asia Cosmopolitan Publics: Anglophone Print Culture in Semi-Colonial Shanghai. By Shuang Shen. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2009. 190 pp. Cloth $39.95. In recent years, scholars engaged in the study of Asia Pacific modernities have steadily eroded the intellectual boundaries that used to divide area studies, diaspora studies, ethnic studies, and comparative literature. Shuang Shen's Cosmopolitan Publics opens up new directions for this project by examining what might, at first glance, appear to be a relatively minor cultural phenomena: anglophone periodical culture in semicolonial Shanghai from the late 1920s until the mid-1940s. Shen's book is both a rich archival study and a theoretically astute analysis that demonstrates how translation created a transnational public sphere in a city that was under the control of various colonial powers until the end of the Second World War when it reverted to republican rule. Shen offers an original approach to the topic of translation by asking how a language associated with colonial domination, namely English, changed and flourished when mobilized by colonized subjects. As Shen notes, this question has been posed in relation to (post)colonial cultures in places such as South Asia and Africa, but while scholars such as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Cosmopolitan Publics: Anglophone Print Culture in Semi-Colonial Shanghai (review)

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 47 (3) – Oct 16, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/cosmopolitan-publics-anglophone-print-culture-in-semi-colonial-F1U9OOY0b0
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
1528-4212
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

book reviews asia Cosmopolitan Publics: Anglophone Print Culture in Semi-Colonial Shanghai. By Shuang Shen. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2009. 190 pp. Cloth $39.95. In recent years, scholars engaged in the study of Asia Pacific modernities have steadily eroded the intellectual boundaries that used to divide area studies, diaspora studies, ethnic studies, and comparative literature. Shuang Shen's Cosmopolitan Publics opens up new directions for this project by examining what might, at first glance, appear to be a relatively minor cultural phenomena: anglophone periodical culture in semicolonial Shanghai from the late 1920s until the mid-1940s. Shen's book is both a rich archival study and a theoretically astute analysis that demonstrates how translation created a transnational public sphere in a city that was under the control of various colonial powers until the end of the Second World War when it reverted to republican rule. Shen offers an original approach to the topic of translation by asking how a language associated with colonial domination, namely English, changed and flourished when mobilized by colonized subjects. As Shen notes, this question has been posed in relation to (post)colonial cultures in places such as South Asia and Africa, but while scholars such as

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Oct 16, 2010

There are no references for this article.