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Civil Society: The Unanswered Question of Where Power Resides

Civil Society: The Unanswered Question of Where Power Resides James M. Glass ished in this competitive and contingent world of possessors, doers and aspiring capitalists. However, it is not at all clear that Proponents of civil society assume that where association lies, membership in these associations "improved" moral character power follows. Yet, power resides in social and cultural sites that or elevated the level of democracy's ethical life. Rosenblum, for have little to do with formal institutions of political power and example, questions the Aristotelian assumption that participathe political functions of voluntary associations. The Aristotelian tion enriches moral character. "The existence of a dense array virtue of participation (at the heart of the literature extolling the of associations," she argues, "may fail to contribute to the moral democratic benefits of association) guards against tyranny in uses of pluralism" (1998, 46). Further, the groupishness of volpublic institutions; but power also moves along cultural grids untary associations may submerge individual identity, leading to which have little attachment to public or governmental structure, "self-inflation" and a corresponding damage to "moral personpower that works on the self in everyday life, power that minisality" (1998, 62), real consequences for democratic rights and ters to the body, its regulation and treatment, its containment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Civil Society: The Unanswered Question of Where Power Resides

The Good Society , Volume 12 (1) – Dec 2, 2003

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

James M. Glass ished in this competitive and contingent world of possessors, doers and aspiring capitalists. However, it is not at all clear that Proponents of civil society assume that where association lies, membership in these associations "improved" moral character power follows. Yet, power resides in social and cultural sites that or elevated the level of democracy's ethical life. Rosenblum, for have little to do with formal institutions of political power and example, questions the Aristotelian assumption that participathe political functions of voluntary associations. The Aristotelian tion enriches moral character. "The existence of a dense array virtue of participation (at the heart of the literature extolling the of associations," she argues, "may fail to contribute to the moral democratic benefits of association) guards against tyranny in uses of pluralism" (1998, 46). Further, the groupishness of volpublic institutions; but power also moves along cultural grids untary associations may submerge individual identity, leading to which have little attachment to public or governmental structure, "self-inflation" and a corresponding damage to "moral personpower that works on the self in everyday life, power that minisality" (1998, 62), real consequences for democratic rights and ters to the body, its regulation and treatment, its containment

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Dec 2, 2003

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